Hank Aaron is getting vile racist hate mail in retaliation for pointing out that racism still exists

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This is both ironic and pathetic. Last week, as we celebrated the anniversary of Hank Aaron breaking Babe Ruth’s home run record, Aaron recounted the hate mail and threats he received back in the 70s as he approached the milestone. In doing so, he noted that racism isn’t dead. It’s just changed and has become more insidious.

Some people got mad at that. So mad that they decided to send racist hate mail to Aaron. From Bob Nightengale at USA Today:

Sheer racism, exposed in vile letters directed to Hall of Fame great Hank Aaron, have poured into the Atlanta Braves offices this past week.

Yes, it was like 1974 all over again, the year he broke Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record, with letters laced with the most hateful epithet known to African Americans.

“Hank Aaron is a scumbag piece of (expletive) (racial slur)” a man named Edward says in an e-mail to the Braves front office and obtained by USA TODAY Sports.

Edward invokes the epithet five times in four sentences, closing with, “My old man instilled in my mind from a young age, the only good (racial slur) is a dead (racial slur).”

OK, dude. We see your point. Apologies. There is no racism anymore. Hank Aaron was wrong to even suggest it.

Good lord.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.