Doug Glanville’s story about being racially profiled at his own home

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Whenever race comes up around here there are always people who like to talk about how racism doesn’t exist anymore and they don’t see color and stuff like that. About how people who bring up racism are the real racists. Or at least the people who are actually obsessed with race.

They’re cute in their own twisted way.

I’m curious to see their response to this story by former major leaguer Doug Glanville. He was shoveling his own driveway in his upscale Hartford, Connecticut neighborhood when a police officer — from a different jurisdiction, actually — came up to him and assumed he was some itinerant jobber trying to make a few bucks by annoying white people into allowing him to shovel their driveways.

As Glanville explains, he is trying to use the experience as a teachable moment. But as he also makes clear: this isn’t some freakishly rare thing. And even though he himself was not substantially harmed by the incident in the eyes of most people, it does not make it a harmless incident.

But please, if you do wish to continue on with the notion that racism is something that died in 1964, by all means, explain how this fits in with your world view.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.