Is A-Rod being investigated for obstruction of justice? What about Major League Baseball?

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This from the Daily News over the weekend is interesting. There’s a grand jury convened in Florida arising out of the whole Biogenesis thing. And it may bring A-Rod back into the headlines:

The grand jury is primarily interested in determining the source of the drugs Biogenesis founder Anthony Bosch supplied to Rodriguez and other players, one of the sources told The News. But other law-enforcement officials are trying to determine if Rodriguez, currently serving a season-long suspension for violating MLB’s drug policy, attempted to obstruct investigations into the defunct Coral Gables anti-aging clinic.

I find this a little rich. A-Rod may or may not have tried to obstruct MLB investigators — the evidence on that was rather thin, as the small portion of his suspension related to obstruction showed — but last I checked Major League Baseball is not law enforcement. I know they act like it all the time, what with the Mitchell Report and the Biogenesis thing, but they really are just a private business with revenues somewhere between the largest law firms and mid-sized regional supermarket chains.

Also, last I checked, it was Major League Baseball, not Alex Rodriguez, who paid off the very man who distributed the drugs that are subject to this grand jury investigation and purchased stolen documents in the course of its own investigation. Who provided him with counsel in the event anyone comes investigating him and indemnified him from any bad things that may come his way as a result. I don’t know if that’s obstruction of justice, but it’s way closer to the kind of things that get charged as such than the stuff A-Rod is said to have done.

So, sure, investigate Alex Rodriguez. But explain why Major League Baseball shouldn’t be investigated too.

Six-year old boy reports the Indians want to give Francisco Lindor a seven-year contract

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The substance of the report is not shocking. Francisco Lindor is one of baseball’s brightest young stars and the Cleveland Indians would, no doubt, wish to lock him up for an extended period of time. The surprising part is the guy who reported that, yes, the Indians are working to get Lindor a seven-year extension.

That guy: six-year-old Brody Chernoff, son of Indians general manager Mike Chernoff. Brody was invited into the team’s broadcast booth during the ninth inning of their game against the Chicago White Sox. Indians announcer Tom Hamilton asked, no doubt jokingly, if his working on anything interesting. Brody:

“He’s trying to get, um, Lindor to play for seven more years,”

Again, not shocking. It would’ve been way worse if Brody had said “Dad’s working on a three-way deal that’ll send Naquin to an NL team in order to affect a three-way trade that’ll land us Verlander without having to deal directly with a divisional rival.” But I imagine Dad still would’ve preferred he not mention that.

Watch:

Braves sign David Hernandez

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Bill Whitehead of the Atlanta Journal Constitution reports that the Braves have signed reliever David Hernandez to a minor league contract on Sunday. He’ll report to spring training as a non-roster invitee.

Hernandez, who turns 32 years old in May, signed a minor league contract with the Giants in February. He requested and was granted his release on Friday when he learned he wasn’t making the team’s 25-man roster to open the season.

Hernandez pitched for the Phillies last year. He compiled a 3.84 ERA with an 80/32 K/BB ratio in 72 2/3 innings.