Michael Pineda makes a strong impression in Yankees debut


Michael Pineda made his Yankees debut on Saturday against the Blue Jays, more than two years after he joined the club in the trade that sent then-prospect Jesus Montero to the Mariners. During spring training, Pineda injured the labrum in his right shoulder and eventually underwent surgery in May. Pineda missed all of the 2012 season and most of the 2013 season recovering.

In June last season, Pineda was finally cleared to begin pitching against live competition. He joined the Single-A Tampa Yankees for two starts, then the Double-A Trenton Thunder for two starts, and finally the Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Railriders for six starts. In total, the right-hander posted a 3.32 ERA with 41 strikeouts and 14 unintentional walks in 40 2/3 innings. The final step was spring training. In 15 innings this past spring, Pineda posted a 1.20 ERA with 16 strikeouts and one walk. At the end of March, manager Joe Girardi announced that Pineda would, at long last, be a part of the Yankees’ rotation.

In his Yankees debut tonight, the 25-year-old right-hander held the Jays to one run on five hits with no walks and five strikeouts over six innings. The Yankees, unfortunately, couldn’t support him with any offense and Pineda took a tough-luck loss. According to Pitch F/X, Pineda was in the 92-94 MPH range, hitting 95 at times.

The real test, of course, will be Pineda’s ability to turn in solid outings on a consistent basis. But step one, at least, was a huge success. The Yankees, who lost first baseman Mark Teixeira to injury on Friday, could use some uplifting news right about now.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

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Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to MLB.com. 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.