Barry Bonds booed, cheered, hated-on at PNC Park

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Barry Bonds was on hand at PNC Park to present Andrew McCutchen with his 2013 MVP Award this afternoon. Bonds is likely a polarizing figure in Pittsburgh. His leaving via free agency following the 1992 season kicked off the Pirates’ two decades plus in the wilderness. Plus all the PEDs stuff. As a result, you have to assume there would be a lot of boos for him. But you also would figure that some people would cheer for him there because he did play an awful lot of great baseball in Pittsburgh and his Pirates teams won a lot of games.

I didn’t get the broadcast on in time to see Bonds’ appearance, but I went to Twitter to see the reactions:

I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that (a) there were boos and cheers; and (b) whether you think there were substantially more of one than the other says more about what you think of Barry Bonds than what 40,000 people in the crowd do.

In other news, regarding Sullivan’s tweet: what is one supposed to if one is booed apart from “appearing oblivious?” Is Bonds supposed to cry? Beat someone up? Or is he supposed to just sit there and display character traits that we really want him to have because we dislike him, like obliviousness?

Or maybe I’m off base here and maybe it was hard to get a gauge on what was happening there? Maybe people don’t have particularly strong opinions?

Oh.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.