Details of Mike Trout’s contract extension with the Angels

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The Angels and superstar outfielder Mike Trout have agreed to terms on a six-year extension which is reportedly worth $144.5 million. FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal has the year-by-year breakdown:

2015: $5.25 million
2016: $15.25 million
2017: $19.25 million
2018: $33.25 million
2019: $33.25 million
2020: $33.25 million

While the Angels surely would have liked to have him for longer, they have to be thrilled that they were able to buy out three free agent years. The deal includes a $5 million signing bonus and Trout will receive a full no-trade clause. The two sides already agreed to a one-year, $1 million deal for 2014 in February, so this new extension will not count toward the team’s luxury tax until 2015. With high-priced names like Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton already on the payroll, that’s a big deal.

Trout’s extension is the second-largest ever for a player with less than three years of MLB service. Buster Posey still holds the record with his eight-year, $159 million extension with the Giants. However, Trout’s $24.1 million AAV (average annual value) blows away Posey’s $19.875 million AAV.

Trout will be 29 at the end of the extension, which sets him up for another major payday. If he can keep up his current pace, his next deal will likely be the richest in baseball history.

Kyle Schwarber is “probably, arguably” in The Best Shape of His Life

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Joe Maddon just held his annual media availability here at the Winter Meetings. During the scrum he said that Kyle Schwarber “looked great the other day” at a Cubs community event and that . . . wait for it . . . “he’s in, probably, arguably in the best shape of his life.” Maddon went on to say that, if Schwarber looks good in spring training, he might even be the Cubs leadoff hitter in 2018.

Schwarber is only 24, but the former catcher turned outfielder is going to spend most of his career as a DH, with another team obviously, unless he shows the Cubs that he can be a regular defender. The Cubs would love to see him in better shape whether they keep him or shop him, and if it’s the latter, they’ll want to show potential trade partners that he can play defense so as not to limit his market. It’s in everyone’s interests for him to be lean, mean and a bit more flexible once spring training starts.

To that end, according to a recent report, Schwarber “has been on a mission this offseason to transform his body.” And now Maddon is playing up the BSOHL angle. Whether that’s salesmanship or not, all eyes are going to be on Schwarber come February.