More of the PED double standard on display

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There was a panel in Arizona last week which the topic of PED use was discussed. Among the panel members was Jane Leavy, who wrote what many consider to be the definitive biography of Mickey Mantle. Her take on players of the recent Steroids Era and the fitness of guys like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Mark McGwire for the Hall of Fame:

“I don’t have a vote, and I wouldn’t vote for any of them,” said Leavy—not a single one of the players who admitted drug use or were named in the Mitchell report on PEDs in baseball. “I think there should be a hall of shame for those guys,” she said.

I have no idea how one can write an entire biography of Mickey Mantle — complete with a passage in which Mantle’s visit to the infamous Max “Dr. Feelgood” Jacobson, where an amphetamines injection caused an infection that knocked him out of the home run race in 1961 — and conclude that while he is a worthy Hall of Famer, the guys of the 1990s and 2000s should be in a “Hall of Shame.” Let alone the many other players who used amphetamines in the 1950s and 60s, which she chronicled.

But I suppose this double standard is OK, as it always has been.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.