More of the PED double standard on display


There was a panel in Arizona last week which the topic of PED use was discussed. Among the panel members was Jane Leavy, who wrote what many consider to be the definitive biography of Mickey Mantle. Her take on players of the recent Steroids Era and the fitness of guys like Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Mark McGwire for the Hall of Fame:

“I don’t have a vote, and I wouldn’t vote for any of them,” said Leavy—not a single one of the players who admitted drug use or were named in the Mitchell report on PEDs in baseball. “I think there should be a hall of shame for those guys,” she said.

I have no idea how one can write an entire biography of Mickey Mantle — complete with a passage in which Mantle’s visit to the infamous Max “Dr. Feelgood” Jacobson, where an amphetamines injection caused an infection that knocked him out of the home run race in 1961 — and conclude that while he is a worthy Hall of Famer, the guys of the 1990s and 2000s should be in a “Hall of Shame.” Let alone the many other players who used amphetamines in the 1950s and 60s, which she chronicled.

But I suppose this double standard is OK, as it always has been.

David Phelps to undergo Tommy John surgery

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Pitcher David Phelps has a torn UCL and will undergo Tommy John surgery, ending his 2018 season, the Mariners announced on Wednesday. Phelps was making brief one-inning stints in the Cactus League as he worked his way back from a procedure to remove a bone spur from his elbow last September. He said he felt the ligament tear on his final pitch against the Angels in his March 17 appearance.

Phelps, 31, was expected to set up for closer Edwin Diaz. The right-hander, between the Marlins and Mariners last season, posted a 3.40 ERA with a 62/26 K/BB ratio in 55 2/3 innings. He and the Mariners avoided arbitration in January, agreeing on a $5.55 million salary for the 2018 campaign. Phelps will become eligible to become a free agent at the end of the season.

As the Mariners noted in their statement, the expected recovery period for Tommy John surgery is 12-15 months, so this very likely cuts into Phelps’ 2019 season as well.