There’s a new rule on walkup music? OK.

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Things you can totally miss even if you do nothing but read crap about baseball all day, even in the winter: Major League Baseball has a new rule that limits batters’ walkup music to no more than 15 seconds.

I learn this by reading about Shane Victorino’s disappointment with the new rule over at WEEI. He has taken to using Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds,” in which the crowd booms in with “Every little things/gonna be alright!” Which comes way past the 15 second mark. Victorino thinks the rule is taking away from the fan experience and that it could impact batters’ rhythms and things.

I’ll admit: being at Game 6 of the World Series and listening to the crowd sing along with Shane and Bob was kind of cool. Maybe even chill-inducing. But (a) I imagine that effect wears off after more than a game, especially when the games aren’t last-game-of-the-World-Series intense; and (b) if everyone did that kind of stuff games would take even longer than they already do.

The lesson: go with punk rock, kids. Those songs are all short and sweet and will get things moving along while still pumping people up.

Jonny Venters is still pitching

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Lefty reliever Jonny Venters was among a handful of players the Rays signed to minor league contracts, Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Venters, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2012 and has logged just 27 2/3 innings in the minors in the meantime due to a continuous battle with his elbow. According to David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Venters has undergone four — four! — Tommy John surgeries.

When he was healthy, Venters was a fearsome late-game option for the Braves. He posted a 1.95 ERA with 93 strikeouts in 83 innings in 2010, and a 1.84 ERA with 96 strikeouts in 88 innings in 2011. His first-half performance in 2011 earned him a spot on the National League All-Star roster.

Venters has spent the last two years in the Rays’ system and he’ll try to make it a third.