Wanna see a picture of Aroldis Chapman’s stapled head?

6 Comments

Reds closer Aroldis Chapman was hit in the head by a Salvador Perez line drive on Wednesday night, suffering fractures above his left eye and nose. He underwent surgery on Thursday to repair the fractures and had a metal plate inserted on the bone above his left eye to stabilize the fracture.

Thankfully, Chapman is expected to make a full recovery. In fact, he could resume working out in 10-14 days, and enter game conditions within four to six weeks.  That means we could see Chapman back in regular season action some time in June if everything goes according to schedule.

In the meantime, Chapman is in good spirits. He posted a picture to Instragram of the staples he had inserted around his head. Normally, I’d just embed the picture, but if you’re a touch squeamish as I am, you might not want the unexpected sight. So click here if you’d like to see what his head looked like shortly after the surgery.

Chapman captioned the picture with the following caption:

Mi gente todo esta bien gracias a dios ya salimos de todo tipo de problema estoy aquí esperando q me den de alta

According to a Spanish-speaking Redditor, that loosely translates to, “My people, everything is good, thank god. We have already passed all the problems and I am here awaiting my release (from the hospital).”

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
1 Comment

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
Leave a comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.