Tanner Scheppers impresses in final bid for rotation spot

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Tanner Scheppers pitched well Friday afternoon, allowing two runs in six innings of work in the Rangers’ 7-5 victory over the Brewers. He started off in hot water, as the Brewers scored two runs with two doubles and a single, but Scheppers induced an inning-ending double play and never looked back. He struck out six and didn’t issue a walk.

Scheppers was one of baseball’s best set-up men last season, posting a 1.88 ERA in 76 2/3 innings. Now he’s attempting to slot into the back of the Rangers’ injury-ravaged starting rotation. Friday afternoon’s start might have sealed the deal. He now has a 3.07 ERA in 14 2/3 Cactus League innings along with 14 strikeouts and four walks. His competition is left-hander Robbie Ross.

Adam J. Morris of SB Nation’s Rangers blog Lone Star ball thinks Scheppers will break camp with the rotation spot in hand, as will Ross, with Matt Harrison (back) and Colby Lewis (elbow and hip) starting the season on the disabled list. The Rangers haven’t given any official word on what they’re doing yet, but they have plenty of bullpen depth and not so much in the rotation, so they can afford to have Scheppers swap roles.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.