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Jose Abreu doesn’t think the big leagues are so hard


White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu is hitting .308 with an .838 OPS this spring, including a home run yesterday, and the Cuban rookie had an amusing quote when asked by Jesse Sanchez of how he’s adjusting to the big leagues:

The baseball is not exactly what I thought it would be. I’ve never played at this level and I expected it to be really, really difficult. I knew it wasn’t going to be impossible, but the coaches and teammates here have really helped me and made it easier. I feel like I can handle it.

Abreu went on to expand upon that quote, saying some interesting stuff about velocity and adjustments, but I still think “I expected it to be really, really difficult” is pretty funny. Of course, it helps that Abreu is considered one of the best hitters to come out of Cuba, getting $68 million to sign with the White Sox, and most projection systems have him making a big impact right away, potentially adding 30-homer power to the lineup.

Jason Kipnis plans to play through a disgusting-looking ankle sprain

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 14:  Jason Kipnis #22 of the Cleveland Indians fields the ball against the Toronto Blue Jays during game one of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 14, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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Jason Kipnis sprained his ankle while celebrating the Indians ALCS win over the Blue Jays. In the runup to tonight’s game, Terry Francona has said that Kipnis would be fine, that he’s a gamer, etc., etc. You know, the usual “when the bell rings, all of the aches and pains go away” kind of thing.

Today, however, we see that this sprained ankle is maybe not your run-of-the-mill late season bump or bruise:


Um, yikes.

Indians beat writer jumps in Lake Erie to settle a bet

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Back in September Cleveland Plain Dealer beat writer Paul Hoynes ruffled a lot of feathers when he declared the Indians DOA. His rationale: too many injuries to Indians starters weakened the club too greatly. Even if they did make the playoffs, Hoynes argued, they wouldn’t go far.

A reader made a bet with him at the time: if the Indians didn’t make the World Series, he’d jump in Lake Erie. If they did, Hoynes would.

Today Hoynes made good on his bet. You haven’t lived until you’ve seen a baseball writer drop trou, by the way: