Dodgers P.R. Director: we want to give news out to because they’ll spin it the way we want


This is likely to anger a lot of folks. Dodgers Public Relations Director Joe Jareck is down in Sydney and had this to say about how teams release news:

Jareck said this about how the team prefers to get its news out: best to publish on its own website,, because then “we can spin it any way we want. You can tell the (in-house) writer, ‘Here do this’ and they’ll do it”

He has since backtracked and claimed he was talking about minor news and P.R. initiatives, but it wasn’t too strong a backtrack. He admitted he was talking about spinning trades and things too.

Can the people be spun? Well, sometimes. As Deadspin’s handling of this notes, reporters do work for the league, and they’re likely under the same sorts of pressures anyone is when it comes to reporting on their own company. If you want to hear about the day-to-day, the on-the-field product and feature stories about players, is going to be good for you (assuming your team’s person is a good one). You don’t go for them if you’re looking for some hearty “this owner is a cheapskate” rhetoric, a takedown of a player or a dismantling of the recent stadium deal.

But this is not some unique feature of reporters. Whether it’s an access issue or business dealings or sponsorships or any number of other things, newspapers and television outlets are often just as compromised in reporting on baseball teams. They’re just compromised in other ways than I won’t name names here, but there are some papers where coverage of the local nine puts Pravda to shame, and you know it’s about keeping the reporter in the team’s good graces. There are newspaper editorial boards and networks who, when it comes to large team issues like ownership and stadiums and broadcasting and things, will always be in the team’s camp. And while I’m throwing stones here, allow me to throw one at myself and admit that if there was a big scandal involving NBC or one of its personalities, even if it touched on baseball, you’d not likely get the hottest, sharpest take from me, even if I did try to find a way to deliver the basic facts. That’s business. It applies to baseball writers and commentators no matter who employs them.

As for I have read all of its reporters and writers and have met a great many of them, and I can say that there is a pretty large disparity between the best of the reporters and the not-so-good ones. If you’re a not so good one, you’re probably likely to be a bit lazy and just regurgitate press releases and if you do that long enough you’re going to look like a house organ. In many cases, however, — maybe most cases; it just varies by city and team — the reporter is just as good if not better than their newspaper counterparts. If I want Tigers skinny, I prefer Jason Beck. Indians: Jordan Bastian. Todd Zolecki with the Phillies is fantastic. Mark Sheldon and the Reds. For commentary Matt Leach and Richard Justice are excellent. This is not an exhaustive list, but just some of them who spring to mind.

All in all, yes, there is probably some truth there. I don’t think it applies as strongly as he thinks it does to reporter Ken Gurnick who seems to be pretty straightforward when it comes to his reporting, but generally speaking, yes, teams probably do feel safer talking to folks because they feel — erroneously or otherwise — that they have some recourse if they don’t like how the story plays. I don’t think that means they’re unreliable or malleable like Jareck says here — my observation is that the people do their job pretty damn well and on generally the same footing as their newspaper counterparts — but no, the team isn’t going to be ripped a new one by the guy.

I find Jareck’s second comment more interesting:

. . . “I’m of the belief we should give everything to — there are more eyeballs there. Gone are the days when The Los Angeles Times ruled the city.” He continued, “Very few [media] have that kind of influence anymore. So I’m of the view of giving it to our own website which is double or triple what the readership of the Los Angeles Times is in print and online.”

I like this because (a) he has something of a point here, even if he overstates it; and (b) it’s right in line with something I’ve been saying about news coverage for a long time. Specifically, that “commodity news” — the basic facts of injuries, lineups, trades or anything that the team knows first — is becoming less important for media companies. Teams (and governments and businesses) are increasingly in-housing this stuff and, as such, those who aren’t in-house should focus on non-commodity news and reporting. Don’t tell us what the news nugget is, tell us what it means, why it’s significant or why it’s misleading. Don’t tell us what the player said after the game, tell us what makes the player tick and what he says when he’s not in some guarded environment like a press conference. Let the P.R. savvy teams control what they can control and stake your voice and reputation on the things they cannot.

I hate that Jareck said this the way he did, because it’s likely to lead to a lot of people to become skeptical or disparging with respect to some excellent reporters and most of them don’t deserve that. No small amount of this will come from people who work for newspapers who have always, to some degree or another, resented the people, have barred them from their professional organizations and who grouse behind reporters’ backs about them and their enterprise (yes, I’ve heard this).

But he did say it. And that little downside notwithstanding, there are some pretty important takeaways here about how the media operates in the 21st century and, to some extent, how maybe it should operate.

The Red Sox get their ace! Boston signs David Price to a 7-year, $217 million deal


Multiple reports circulated in the past week that the Red Sox would need to unload the money truck in order to sign David Price. Well, the truck just got unloaded: Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe reports that the Red Sox have signed David Price to a seven-year, $217 million contract.

This is, by far, the largest free agent contract the Red Sox have ever given a pitcher. It beats Max Scherzer‘s seven-year, $210 million deal signed last offseason as the largest ever free agent pitcher contract. Clayton Kershaw‘s contract extension with the Dodgers was for $215 million.

Price went 82-47 with a 3.18 ERA pitching in the AL East while with the Tampa Bay Rays. After being traded to the Tigers just before the 2014 trade deadline he went 13-8 with a 2.90 ERA in 32 starts. He returned to the AL East with the Blue Jays this year, going 9-1 with a 2.30 ERA in 11 starts. He also pitched in the playoffs for the Jays starting three times in four overall appearances.

The Red Sox were in dire need of pitching and they were said to be gunning for Price to fill that need. Target: acquired.

Major League Baseball’s annual drug testing report has been released

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MLB and the MLBPA just released the annual public report from the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program’s Independent Program Administrator. It’s the annual report, mandated by the JDA, which says how many positive drug tests there were, what the drugs were, etc.

The notable numbers, which cover the period starting when the 2014 World Series ended until the 2015 World Series ended:

  • Total number of tests administered: 8,158. 6,536 of them were urine tests, 1,622 of them were blood tests for HGH;
  • 10 tests resulted in positives which led to discipline: 7 for PEDs, 2 for stimulants, one for DHEA;
  • The previous year there were 7,929 total tests with 12 which resulted in discipline;
  • There were the same number of Therapeutic Use Exemptions granted this year as last: 113. All but two were for attention deficit disorder. One was for gynecomastia, which is the swelling of the breast tissue in men due to a hormone imbalance, one was for a stress fracture in someone’s elbow.

A use exemption line item which had appeared on the list for the previous several years — hypogonadism — was not there, so congratulations to the anonymous player who was either cured or who retired.

As we always note, the number of players who got exemptions for ADD drugs is a bit higher than the occurrence of ADD in the population at large and, once you eliminate kids from ADHD occurrences, it’s likely considerably higher. But that’s none of my business.

Kendrys Morales wins the Edgar Martinez DH of the Year Award

Kansas City Royals' Kendrys Morales watches his solo home run during the fourth inning in Game 1 of baseball's American League Division Series against the Houston Astros, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
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Only seven hitters in the American League got enough plate appearances while primarily serving time as DH to qualify for the batting title in 2015. And of those some of them — most notably Edwin Encarnacion — played a fair bit of defense, meaning that there weren’t too many guys who could really be called true DHs in the game. Still they give out an award for being the best DH, you only need 100 plate appearances as a DH to be eligible and Kendrys Morales just won it:

Morales received 50 of the 88 first-place votes cast to garner the honor for the first time in his nine-year career . . . Boston’s David Ortiz, a seven-time winner of the ODH Award, finished second with 34 second-place votes after batting .267 (132-for-495) with 35 doubles, 32 homers and 99 RBI in 134 games as DH for the Red Sox this past season . . . Kendrys batted .295 (156-for-529) with 39 doubles, 21 home runs, 104 RBI and 78 runs scored in 141 games as DH for the Royals.

Defense — which for this award has to be thought of as a demerit, right? — couldn’t have separated these two as they both slummed it at first base for nine games. Overall I’d rather have had Ortiz, who walked more, hit for greater power and, batting average notwithstanding, got on base at almost exactly the same clip as Morales did. Similar arguments could be made for A-Rod and Prince Fielder, but no one asks me about such things. They do ask club beat writers, broadcasters and AL public relations departments, however, who vote on the award.

It’s an award that has been around a while — this was the 42nd year for it — but it’s just been known as the Edgar Martinez Award since 2004. It would’ve been really weird if it had been called that in 1978. Martinez was just 15 then.

Twins sign Korean slugger Byung-ho Park to four-year contract

Byung-ho Park
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With a week remaining in their exclusive negotiating window to sign Byung-ho Park the Twins have agreed to a deal with the Korean slugger. Ken Rosenthal of reports that it’s a four-year, $12 million contract, on top of which the Twins will pay Park’s old team a $12.85 million posting fee for those negotiating rights.

Four years and a total commitment of $24.85 million is certainly a sizable investment, but it’s significantly less than most projections had the Twins spending to get Park under contract.

Last offseason the Pirates bid $5 million to negotiate with Korean shortstop Jung Ho Kang and then signed him to a four-year, $11 million deal. His success in MLB raised the level of interest in Park, who posted similarly spectacular numbers in Korean, but in the end the price tag wasn’t significantly higher. Based on reports from Korea, it sounds like the Twins low-balled him in negotiations and Park basically just accepted it because he wants to play in MLB.

Three weeks ago I wrote a lengthy breakdown of how Park could fit into the Twins’ plans when they secured the high bid, but the short version is that he’ll slot into the lineup as the starting designated hitter and look to prove that his exceptional production in Korean can carry over to MLB. Park hit .343 with 53 homers, 146 RBIs, and a 1.150 OPS in 140 games for Nexen this past season and has topped a 1.000 OPS in each of the past three years.