The D-Backs weren’t kidding about the retaliation thing

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Back in October, Diamondbacks GM Kevin Towers made headlines extolling the virtues of protecting your teammates. Towers was particularly upset that first baseman Paul Goldschmidt was hit by a pitch and the pitching staff did nothing — no revenge. From MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert:

Tuesday on his weekly show broadcast on KTAR 620AM, Towers was asked about his comments earlier in the day about wanting the D-backs’ pitchers to own the inner half of the plate.

“But I think come Spring Training, it will be duly noted that it’s going to be an eye for an eye and we’re going to protect one another,” Towers said of what his message would be to the pitchers next spring. “If not, if you have options, there’s ways to get you out of here, and you don’t follow suit or you don’t feel comfortable doing it, you probably don’t belong in a Diamondbacks uniform.”

On Wednesday, D-Backs first baseman Mark Trumbo was hit in the back by Rockies pitcher Tommy Kahnle in the top of the fourth inning. In the bottom half of the fourth, D-Backs pitcher Wade Miley threw at Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, hitting him in the calf. As a result, Tulowitzki has been dealing with a deep calf bruise and pain in his fibula as well, and won’t play for another few days.

Manager Kirk Gibson denied that there was intent behind Miley’s errant pitch to Tulowitzki. Via Troy Renck of the Denver Post:

“It’s part of the game. It can happen in spring or during the regular season,” Gibson said. “I think one of the things we’ve focused on is using all quadrants of the plate. We’re not out there intentionally trying to hurt anybody. Nobody wants their guy to get hit and neither do we, but it’s part of the game.”

Renck correctly adds that, as a result of their previous comments on the issue, the D-Backs can’t be given the benefit of the doubt. While no one on the Rockies would come out and say point-blank that they think the D-Backs threw at Tulowitzki intentionally, the devil was in the details.

Hopefully, this is the last we hear of D-Backs pitchers throwing at opposing players. Otherwise, it might not be until someone gets hit in the head and suffers a concussion that their embarrassing behavior is punished.

Hideki Matsui thinks Shohei Otani should pitch and hit in MLB

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Yankees’ special advisor and former outfielder Hideki Matsui expects to help the club “convince or recruit” Japanese two-way star Shohei Otani, according to a report from MLB.com’s Deesha Thosar. The Yankees are currently viewed as the favorites to sign Otani, though there still figures to be plenty of competition for his services when he finally becomes eligible to enter Major League Baseball.

Matsui also told Thosar that while he hasn’t seen a player find success as a hybrid pitcher/slugger in the majors, he’s taken notice of Otani’s success in both areas. “He’s done well in Japan, so as a baseball fan I’m looking forward to how he’s going to do here in the Majors and in the U.S.,” Matsui said, later adding, “If [pitching and hitting is] something he wants to do, and the team wants it, then why not?”

Neither the Yankees nor any other suitor should be too concerned with Otani’s ability to translate his .332 batting average and 3.20 ERA to MLB — at least, not just yet. There are still a few roadblocks in his path to the major leagues, most notably the lack of approval from the Players Association. Per FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman, the union doesn’t want to sign off on an agreement that would give the Nippon Ham Fighters a $20 million posting fee in exchange for Otani’s services. According to the posting system rules, Otani himself would be eligible to receive no more than a $4 million signing bonus.

The good news in all of this? The union agreed to reach a final decision by Monday, November 21, so there’s still a chance Major League Baseball will see the talented two-way player bring his unique skillset to the field in 2018.