In the year 2000

The Ballpark of the Future is … kinda trippy

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Sports Illustrated and ballpark architect Populous have combined to do something fun: imagine what a ballpark might look like in the year 2030. Go check it out here. There are artist’s renderings and explanations of all of the unique flourishes and how the concepts of ballpark design will evolve over the next 15-20 years. It’s kinda cool. It’s even got monorails and stuff, and nothing says the future like a monorail.

Of course, like almost all speculative stuff like this, it’s rather utopian and thus extremely unlikely to come to fruition. Often times we don’t realize how futurist stuff like this is unrealistic until many years have passed (people really did think there would be moon colonies by the year 2000 at one point). But sometimes you can see the flaws right out of the gate. This one is in the latter camp.

The biggest thing I see is the unworkability of the “sink into the city” design Populous has come up with here. Part of the explanation:

In this case, the building itself is defined by the edges of the city, acting as a window into the building on game days. There’s no need for fanciful facades, as the stadium instead flows with the park and city. You’ll still find a traditional seating bowl tucked below premium glass-enclosed spaces, but with the future of team revenue not as reliant on gate receipts, designers can offer new types of space. A city park overlooks rightfield . . . and an enlarged berm beyond leftfield gives the stadium community-inspired life and public accessibility 365 days a year.

Tell me one time in the history of baseball when team owners were willing to forego a buck in the interests of public accessibility. Maybe gate receipts will continue to diminish in importance, but in a world where baseball owners (a) demand someone else pay for their parks; (b) nonetheless take all revenues from said park; and (c) still gouge the living hell out of fans because, well, they can, I am not too optimistic that people will be gayly frolicking in a public park beyond the right field wall. Heck, even on non game days I’m sure the public will find limited at best access to this wonderfully integrated-into-the-city park.

I do, on the other hand, love what they have to say about integrated data in the park. The technology stuff is where I imagine ballparks will change the most over the next few decades, with the superstructure, facades and access changing far less than is imagined here.

Anyway: fun stuff. If you can’t get excited by this kind of thing you and I don’t have much to talk about.

Report: Teams have inquired with the Angels about Hector Santiago

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 20:  Hector Santiago #53 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers  at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 20, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported on Monday that the Angels have received inquiries from multiple teams concerning starter Hector Santiago. He adds that the club is willing to listen to offers. Jon Morosi of FOX Sports and MLB Network reports that the Marlins are among the teams that have inquired.

Santiago, 28, has pitched to a 4.32 ERA with 96 strikeouts and 47 walks in 110 1/3 innings. Sabermetric statistics such as FIP, xFIP, and SIERA think the lefty has pitched even worse than his ERA indicates however, pitting 2016 as his worst performance to date.

Santiago is earning $5 million this season and will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility going into 2017.

We also learned earlier that, in an effort to bolster their starting rotation, the Marlins have also shown interest in Wade Miley of the Mariners and Jeremy Hellickson of the Phillies.

Prince Fielder will undergo season-ending neck surgery this week

SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 10: Prince Fielder #84 takes a swing during a game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on June 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The Mariners won the game 7-5. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
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The Rangers placed DH Prince Fielder on the disabled list last week due to more neck discomfort. On Friday, Fielder met with Dr. Drew Dossett, who performed spinal fusion surgery on Fielder in 2014 for a herniated disk in his neck. Dossett has recommended another procedure, so Fielder will undergo season-ending surgery this week, Jeff Wilson of the Fort-Worth Star Telegram reports.

Fielder was having a rough season, batting .212/.292/.334 with eight home runs and 44 RBI in 370 plate appearances. He played in only 42 games in 2014, but returned in 2015 looking more like his old self. Unfortunately, neck and back issues are notoriously difficult to fix. Hopefully, this upcoming procedure does the trick for Fielder.

Fielder is owed $24 million per season through 2020, with the Tigers paying $6 million of it per season.