Red Sox prospect gets arrested, acts like a monumental jackwagon

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Yahoo!’s Jeff Passan has a report about one of the more obnoxious baseball player arrests you’ll ever see. The player: Red Sox’ minor league catcher Jon Denney. The reason for the arrest: driving with a suspended license. But the flavor of the arrest is way better than the charge might indicate:

According to police, Denney said “he was a Boston Red Sox player and he didn’t care [sic] he had money and made more money than we would ever see.” When handcuffed, the report said, Denney said “he would be out in no time because of who he played for and that he made three million a year.”

This, by the way, was his second run-in with the police that evening. Earlier, he had been issued a citation and sent home after being pulled over for fishtailing and was then found to have had a restricted license (work and emergencies only, due to a previous DUI ). At the time of the citation he said he was out on the town “Partying and looking to get some [expletive].” I’m assuming that the censored part was not “dinner” or  “some personal enlightenment.”

Just an epic performance by young Mr. Denney, here. He plays the “I’m rich and famous card,” yet, as Passan notes, he’s not really either of those things. Plus he gets bonus points for the previous DUI, the blatant honesty on why he was out on the town and the subtle style which comes from driving a Ford F-150 Raptor, which is about an 80 on the cool bromobile scale.

Well played indeed. Especially for a guy who hit .203 in the Gulf Coast League last year. I think his future is bright.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: