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Mets pitching coach dropped ethnic slur in clubhouse


You’ll want to read the entire story from Stu Woo of the Wall Street Journal, but here’s an excerpt:

In the New York Mets locker room Monday morning, I was talking with Jeff Cutler, a 30-year old Japanese American from suburban Boston who serves as the interpreter for Japanese-born pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka.

We were talking casually about Asian communities in America when we heard a voice behind us.


Cutler and I turned around. It was Dan Warthen, the Mets pitching coach.

“I’m sorry I called you a ‘Chinaman’ yesterday,” Warthen told Cutler.

“It’s OK,” Cutler replied.

“I didn’t mean to insinuate –- I know you’re not Chinese,” Warthen said. He paused. “I thought it was a pretty good joke, though.”

“It was,” Cutler said, with a small laugh.

Warthen walked away.

Woo asked Cutler if he was offended by the joke and Cutler said he wasn’t, but Woo then asked Cutler to provide the gist of the joke and Cutler responded, “You should ask Dan (Warthen) about that.”

Warthen was supposed to meet with Woo in the Mets’ dugout at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday to discuss what happened but he didn’t show, sending word through Mets vice president of media relations Jay Horwitz that he wasn’t going to comment further about the exchange. Warthen did decide to issue a written statement on Wednesday night, packaged with accompanying words from Mets general manager Sandy Alderson …

Warthen: “I apologize for the thoughtless remarks that I made yesterday in the clubhouse. They were a poor attempt at humor, but were wrong and inappropriate in any setting. I am very sorry.”

Alderson: “On behalf of the entire organization, I apologize for the insensitive remarks made by of one of our staff members. The remarks were offensive and inappropriate and the organization is very sorry.”

Warthen has been the Mets’ pitching coach since 2008. He pitched in the majors from 1975-1978.

World Series Game 2 to start an hour earlier due to forecasted rain

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  The Cleveland Indians and the Chicago Cubs stands during the national anthem prior to Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
Jason Miller/Getty Images
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Major League Baseball announced that the starting time of Game 2 of the World Series between the Cubs and Indians at Progressive Field on Wednesday night has been moved up to 7:08 PM EDT due to a forecast that calls for heavy rain late in the night, ESPN’s Jayson Stark reports.

Jake Arrieta will start for the Cubs against the Indians’ Trevor Bauer, assuming his finger injury doesn’t prevent him from doing so.

While an 8 PM start puts the game in a better TV slot, most of the playoff games have been ending around midnight or later. That makes it difficult for kids on the East coast to watch and enjoy the entirety of the games. As we know, baseball has a looming problem in that its viewing audience is getting steadily older. Having playoff games start at 7 PM consistently — or even 6 PM, for that matter — might be good for the future of the game.

Dexter Fowler becomes first black player to play for the Cubs in the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Tim Bradbury/Getty Images)
Tim Bradbury/Getty Images

The last time the Cubs were in the World Series was 1945, two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball. As such, until Tuesday night, the Cubs never had a black player play for them in the World Series.

Dexter Fowler changed that, leading off the ballgame at Progressive Field against the Indians. Fowler was made aware of this fact three days ago by Rany Jazayerli of The Ringer:

Fowler, in that at-bat, went ahead in the count 2-1 but ended up striking out looking on a Corey Kluber sinker.