Baseball is dying on Twitter, you guys

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A story about Twitter engagement with televised sports shows that (a) half of all Twitter comments about TV shows are sports-related; but (b) baseball lags the other sports:

One league that should be somewhat concerned, however, is Major League Baseball.

In addition to the fourth-worst television ratings in history, the 2013 World Series failed to crack the top 10 in Twitter engagement. That’s troubling given the matchup between teams from major media markets in Boston and St. Louis that have especially engaged and long-standing fanbases, in addition to the nationally compelling “Boston Strong” storyline following the Boston Marathon bombing.

Setting aside the questionable metrics regarding and overall utility of “Twitter engagement,” the same flaws that infect every story about baseball and TV rankings infect this one as well: a failure to appreciate baseball’s hyper-local focus and fan bases and the disperse nature of baseball as a televised event compared to things like football. Baseball is on every day, with as many as 15 games playing. It’s championship is spread out over a week.  Football is a one day a week event for the most part and its big event is the Super Bowl. It’s old territory we’ve discussed around here many, many times.

My experience with baseball on Twitter — which at this point is pretty damn extensive — is that there are extremely strong groups of users centered around specific teams. These groups are generally referred to by team names, actually: “Yankees Twitter,” “Red Sox Twitter,” etc., describing that fan base. Every beat writer is intimately familiar with team-based Twitter communities. Often because they are extremely vocal, sometimes hostile, but undoubtedly passionate. They follow games closely and “engage” I would say, even if I’m not 100% sure what Nielsen means by that term.

Put more broadly: I see no shortage of Twitter engagement in baseball. It tends to drive an awful lot of baseball coverage, marketing and everything else. I am skeptical, however, if whoever is measuring that stuff understands how baseball and baseball fandom work. If they don’t, they certainly wouldn’t be alone in that respect.

Diamondbacks return Rule 5 pick Tyler Jones to Yankees

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Diamondbacks’ right-hander Tyler Jones is headed back to the Yankees, the teams announced on Friday. The Diamondbacks had previously selected Jones in the Rule 5 draft last December, but elected to leave the 27-year-old off of their 40-man roster heading into the 2017 season. Rule 5 draft rules stipulate that when a player is not kept on the receiving team’s roster, the player must be offered back to his original team.

Jones signed a minor league contract with the Yankees prior to the 2016 season. He pitched to an impressive 2.17 ERA, 2.2 BB/9 and 13.2 SO/9 over 45 2/3 innings with Double-A Trenton, but was unable to make the leap to Triple-A or beyond during his stay with the organization.

Jones’ outlook with the Diamondbacks appeared slightly more promising. GM Mike Hazen described the righty as a power arm with a “good fastball and power curveball” after selecting him in the Rule 5 draft, and early reports indicated that Jones would be in the mix for a bullpen spot. A rough spring performance — underscored by his lack of experience at the Triple-A and major league levels — undid most of that confidence, however, and the Diamondbacks weren’t willing to keep him on the active roster throughout the entire 2017 season in order to acquire his control rights.

Jones is set to open the season with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, per a report from the Yankees.

Derek Norris signing with the Rays

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Yahoo Sports’ Tim Brown reports that Derek Norris is signing with the Tampa Bay Rays.

Norris was released by the Nationals nine days ago, made redundant by the Nats’ signing of Matt Wieters and by everyone sliding down a notch on the depth chart below him. Norris hit only .186/.255/.328 with 14 home runs and a .528 OPS for the Padres in 2016.

Still, there always seems to be a place for a backup catcher. For Norris that place is Tampa Bay.