Baseball is dying on Twitter, you guys

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A story about Twitter engagement with televised sports shows that (a) half of all Twitter comments about TV shows are sports-related; but (b) baseball lags the other sports:

One league that should be somewhat concerned, however, is Major League Baseball.

In addition to the fourth-worst television ratings in history, the 2013 World Series failed to crack the top 10 in Twitter engagement. That’s troubling given the matchup between teams from major media markets in Boston and St. Louis that have especially engaged and long-standing fanbases, in addition to the nationally compelling “Boston Strong” storyline following the Boston Marathon bombing.

Setting aside the questionable metrics regarding and overall utility of “Twitter engagement,” the same flaws that infect every story about baseball and TV rankings infect this one as well: a failure to appreciate baseball’s hyper-local focus and fan bases and the disperse nature of baseball as a televised event compared to things like football. Baseball is on every day, with as many as 15 games playing. It’s championship is spread out over a week.  Football is a one day a week event for the most part and its big event is the Super Bowl. It’s old territory we’ve discussed around here many, many times.

My experience with baseball on Twitter — which at this point is pretty damn extensive — is that there are extremely strong groups of users centered around specific teams. These groups are generally referred to by team names, actually: “Yankees Twitter,” “Red Sox Twitter,” etc., describing that fan base. Every beat writer is intimately familiar with team-based Twitter communities. Often because they are extremely vocal, sometimes hostile, but undoubtedly passionate. They follow games closely and “engage” I would say, even if I’m not 100% sure what Nielsen means by that term.

Put more broadly: I see no shortage of Twitter engagement in baseball. It tends to drive an awful lot of baseball coverage, marketing and everything else. I am skeptical, however, if whoever is measuring that stuff understands how baseball and baseball fandom work. If they don’t, they certainly wouldn’t be alone in that respect.

Trevor Rosenthal’s season is over: Cards place him on the 60-day disabled list

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Cardinals closer Trevor Rosenthal is done for the season as the Cardinals have transferred him from the 10-day to the 60-day disabled list.

He had originally been placed on the 10-Day DL last Thursday with “elbow irritation” and “arm tightness” but it’s obviously more than a mere irritation. He has seen two specialists in the past week and, while the team has not given word as to his official diagnosis, both specialists are Tommy John guys, which suggests that major elbow surgery is in the offing for Rosenthal.

Rosenthal finishes the year at 3-4 with a 3.40 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 76/20 in 47.2 innings with 11 saves. He had lost the closer’s job heading into the year but had regained it before going down. Going forward, some combination of Seung Hwan Oh, Tyler Lyons, and John Brebbia will fill cover the end of games as the Cardinals try to climb back into the playoff picture.

Steven Matz underwent season-ending surgery

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Steven Matz underwent season-ending surgery on his left elbow today. The procedure was to reposition a compressed nerve in his elbow.

Matz, 26, has struggled over 13 starts, posting a 6.08 ERA with a 48/19 K/BB ratio in 66.2 innings. That line was, obviously, a function of the bum nerve in the bum elbow. Trouble aside, Matz is expected to be ready for Opening Day in 2018.