Ryan Braun calls himself an “artist,” doesn’t care what fans on the road will shout at him

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Say what you want about Ryan Braun but now, as opposed to in the past, he is realistic. He talks to Bob Nightengale of USA Today about what it’ll be like to be Public Enemy Number One when he goes on the road this year:

“I’m sure it will be a bit adventuresome at times this year, but if anything, it’s probably better now. Normally, you go to Philly and Chicago, and they’re talking about your mom, your sister, your girlfriend, whatever. So, now, it will be just about me.”

I guess that’s the best lemonade one can make out of the lemons he willingly sucked on. And the ego is pretty remarkable too:

“If I perform like I’ve always done, I’ll be one of the best players in this game. I don’t need any added motivation of drama at work.

“I’ll just let my work speak for itself, as every artist should.”

Artist. Oh man.

It’s interesting to watch Braun V.2. He’s taking a tack we’ve not seen much of with people who have stepped in it big time in the past. It’s certainly not a full heel-turn (which would be AWESOME) because he has played the contrition game at home with Brewers fans. But the idea that he legitimately doesn’t seem to care about what people outside of Milwaukee will say and think about him — and that, unlike any other scandal-laden player, he isn’t playing humble — is kind of fun for our entertainment purposes.

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

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Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.