Jet Blue Park is absolutely incredible

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FORT MYERS — I have seen the future of spring training complexes, and its name is Jet Blue Park. Or maybe it’s not the future, because frankly, I’m not sure who else is going to shell out the kind of dough this place likely cost besides big money teams like the Red Sox (or the cities which pay for them on the promise of hordes of fans coming from up north to visit). But either way it’s a palace.

The scale of the complex is the first thing that struck me. It’s out on the edge of Fort Myers, out by the interstate and the airport and thus they had all the land in the world on which to build it. And they used all of that land, it seems. I can’t find such figures for every park, but I’d be shocked if Jet Blue didn’t take up more square acreage than any other spring training complex, for whatever that’s worth. And there are more golf carts on site schlepping people around than I’ve seen anywhere. When I got out of my car to head over a dude came by on a cart and asked me if I wanted a ride. I declined, but by the time I got to the back fields and the clubhouse I sorta wished I had.

And it’s not just acreage. This is the clubhouse:

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Well, it’s not just the clubhouse. It’s the minor league clubhouse too. And team offices. And the weight room. And a dining hall of players and coaches. It’s just a massive building that — perhaps apropos given the name of the place —  makes one think of an airport more than a baseball facility. As do the batting cages:

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“Attention, we have a gate change  . . . your flight will now be departing from Gate E  . . .”  Even the retired numbers are huge:

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I literally couldn’t get into a good position to get them all in one shot. Had to settle for only some of them.

The massive scale is paired with some nice style, too. Unlike every other clubhouse I’ve ever been in, the Sox’ clubhouse has high ceilings and tons of natural light. What a concept: sunlight in a locker room. And tons of room to spread out. Indeed, most veterans have two lockers. You sometimes see a superstar with that setup in spring training, but lots of guys have it here.

On to the ballpark itself:

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It is, as many have noted, Fenway South. That’s actually the formal name of the complex — jetBlue Park at Fenway South — and the name of the street it’s on too. It has exactly the same dimensions as Fenway Park and the same quirks. A manual scoreboard. A Pesky Pole. And, of course, a Green Monster:

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The difference, as you can see, is that there are actually seats in the middle of the Monster, not just the top (where that red umbrella is on the top here is the actual home run line of the Monster in Boston). In order to keep things the same as in the real Fenway, there is a net in front of those middle seats:

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If the ball hits off of it it’s still in play, just as if it were to bounce off the Monster in Fenway. That’s great for the players, I suppose, but it kinda stinks for the people in those seats. I bet a lot of them would love to catch a Fenway double.

But despite all of the major league qualities of the place — and the sheer size — this somehow still feels like a spring training park. This is in contrast to Steinbrenner Field up in Tampa. That place is taller, has tunnels and too much poured concrete and it doesn’t have the same number of areas where people can hang out. It’s in the middle of a city, not some area where you’d plausibly vacation. This place is as imposing as all get-out — it’s not quaint like TigerTown in Lakeland or even the Phillies’ place in Clearwater — but it doesn’t have that same impersonal feel the Yankees’ joint does.

There is probably some larger conclusions and comparisons to be drawn from all of that.  I’ll let you draw them.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

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It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

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The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.