Helmets

Bobby Cox, Bryce Harper and the Braves Philharmonic

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LAKE BUENA VISTA — I’ve done a good job so far today not cheering in the press box. Kris Medlen struck a dude out looking. Evan Gattis just thew out a would-be base stealer. Both of those things are usually worth at least a fist-pump from me when watching a game but I’ve been totally cool today. Yay me.

I did have a fun time wandering around this morning, however. I resisted the urge to go all Chris Farley on my favorite Braves players. I asked Jason Heyward what it was like facing Noah Syndergaard yesterday. He said “rough stuff” but then quickly added “first time I saw him,” so as to suggest it was the unfamiliarity as opposed to the great stuff he throws that was the difference. I spoke with Ryan Doumit about the catching contingent in Atlanta:

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The mix between old guys like Gerald Laird, himself on the one hand and the greener types like Evan Gattis and Christian Bethancourt on the other. For what it’s worth, he thinks Gattis is going to make a great major league catcher based on makeup and all of that.

Alex Wood was fun to talk to as well. We talked about veteran presence, spurred by my question about Tim Hudson being gone and everyone else on the pitching staff being young. His view: what we consider to be a “veteran” for veteran presence purposes these days is very different than most people probably think. It’s about who can give good advice and keep people loose, not about how many miles players have on their odometer. Kris Medlen, Wood said, was only 28, but he’s great for that stuff. There is no sense that the lack of any gray hairs — or in Hudson’s case, no-hairs — is going to be a problem.

Onto the field and a cloudy morning of batting practice and infield drills. The equipment bags were few and far between, but someone with the Braves set this up. I assume for my photo-taking benefit:

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And someone put this in the Braves dugout for my benefit too:

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I asked a Braves employee if, hypothetically, someone were to kidnap Fredi Gonzalez whether Bobby Cox here would be pressed into service. He did not answer. He was probably smart not to. Incentives are kind of a pernicious thing sometimes. They help set unfortunate events into action.

My attention was then turned to the field, where the Braves’ shortstops were taking grounders. Watch, and you’ll something you’ll rarely see over the next couple of years. Andrelton Simmons stone-cold dropping a ball:

No, he wasn’t actually fielding it as much as just farting around, but still. It was jarring.

The Nats showed up around 10AM. The first guy off the bus and out to the dugout and then the field? This guy:

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When he came to bat for the first time today Braves fans booed him. Probably because they think he’s some punk who needs to learn his place and all of that baloney you hear about Harper and Puig and other players like them. The fact that there appears to be zero that this dude does that is, to use the baseball term, horses**t, appears to work hard and have a good attitude is sort of lost on them. I guess that’s what first impressions do, but our first impressions of Harper came several years ago now, when he was painfully young. People need to realize that this is a legit major leaguer and solid guy, by all accounts.

As for the park itself? It’s OK. Not great. Not bad. But OK. It’s smack in the middle of the greater Disney area so I suppose it’s convenient for people who are already here. If you want to come just to see the Braves, however, you have to put up with Disney things whether you like it or not. It’s not like the place is all Disneyfied with Mickey Mouse and stuff, but I was just here in December for both a vacation with the kids and the Winter Meetings so I’m a bit over it. All the way down to the fonts on the signs and the scanners for your Mickey bracelets.

It’s pretty compact. You can park in one place and walk to the ballpark, the back fields and the batting cages. The park itself is pleasant in that it has two full decks, the top one overhanging the bottom, so there are a lot of good seats close to the field:

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In most parks the grass berm, if there is one, is limited to the outfield. Here it wraps all the way around to third base which is a nice touch:

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And finally, the Braves’ Philharmonic — their actual name — played before and during the game. Here they are doing “Little Brown Jug.”

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Later they played “Tequila.” It was quite festive.

As of now it’s the top of the seventh inning and I haven’t cheered or anything. I’ve been on my best behavior.

BBWAA votes to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning next year

Cooperstown
Associated Press
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In addition to naming the Spink Award winner this morning, the Baseball Writers Association of America voted today to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with next year’s vote for the 2018 induction class.

As of now, writers are encouraged to make their votes public and, if they do, they are placed on the BBWAA website. They are not required to, however, and a great many Hall of Fame voters do not. While ballot secrecy is laudable in politics, the Hall of Fame vote brings with it a fundamentally different set of concerns and sentiment has increasingly favored transparency, as opposed to secrecy when it comes to the Hall of Fame.

While some in opposition to this move may claim that public ballots will only lead to criticism, our view is that if you can’t handle some reasonable criticism over your Hall of Fame ballot, you probably need to get out of the business of making history, which is what voting for the Hall of Fame really is.

The Yankee2 to retire Derek Jeter’2 number next 2ea2on

Derek Jeter
Getty Images
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RE2PECT: The Yankees just announced that they will retire Derek Jeter’s number 2 next season. The ceremony will take place on May 14, 2017 at Yankee Stadium.

With Jeter’s number 2 retired the Yankees will have retired 21 numbers. Twenty-two if you count number 8 twice, given that it was retired for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. They also have retired 42 twice, once for Jackie Robinson, which every team has retired, and once for Mariano Rivera who donned 42 before the league-wide retirement of the number. The Yankees will also have put every single-digit number on the shelf. Except for zero, anyway, which no Yankees player has ever worn.

The retired pinstripes break down as follows:

1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
6 Joe Torre
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra
8 Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
20 Jorge Posada
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
42 Mariano Rivera
44 Reggie Jackson
46 Andy Pettitte
49 Ron Guidry
51 Bernie Williams