Red Sox and Jon Lester still have mutual interest in an extension

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Jon Lester said last month that he would be willing to take a discount in order to stay with the Red Sox for the long-term. While he’s currently due to hit free agency after the season, he recently told CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman that he’s still hoping to work out an extension with Boston.

“I don’t like change,” Lester said in an interview with CBSSports.com about a week ago. “I like being where I’ve been. I like the people. I like the surroundings. It feels like home.”

While Lester would like to get a deal done before Opening Day, he won’t put a deadline on talks. As for the Red Sox, they spoke in more general terms, but it’s clear they’d like to keep him if the price is right.

“We appreciate him saying he wants to be a Red Sox. We’re crazy about him,” Werner said, speaking while standing next to Henry.

“We’d all love him to stay and hope he’s pitching for the Red Sox past this year,” Werner continued. “He’s been such a valuable player for us. It would be a great deal for the organization if we can figure out an extension.”

We could see some movement soon, as Rob Bradford of WEEI.com reported yesterday that Lester’s agents, Sam and Seth Levinson, arrived in Red Sox camp.

After a career-worst 4.82 ERA in 2012, Lester bounced back last season by posting a 3.75 ERA in 33 regular season starts and a 1.75 ERA in five postseason starts. He’ll turn 31 years old next January, so a five-year extension in the range of $100 million is a possible benchmark.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: