Joey Votto wants Reds fans to get to know him better


John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer tweeted a link to an interesting video about Joey Votto earlier tonight. (If you can’t watch the video through Twitter, this link should work.)

In the two minute-long video, Votto talks about how many Reds fans have the wrong idea about him. He attributes this to his workmanlike demeanor and to a “skewed perspective” from writers, which has caused Reds fans to view him as aloof and uncaring. Votto says he wants fans to get to know him better.

Votto has also been a lightning rod in the debate between fans of newer stats and fans of older stats. Back in June, Reds broadcaster Marty Brennaman slammed Votto for not having many RBI — he had 37 at the time, on a pace for 80 over a full season. In a radio interview at the end of October, Votto dismissed the judgment directed at him based on RBI, explaining that his number one job is to get on base whether it’s with a hit or with a walk, seemingly aligning himself more with the new school way of thinking.

Love him or hate him, Votto is a very perceptive and introspective person, and we need more players like him in sports these days.

By the way, you can support Votto’s charity by visiting, which helps those suffering from post traumatic stress disorder.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

Rob Tringali/Getty Images

Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.