Joey Votto wants Reds fans to get to know him better

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John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer tweeted a link to an interesting video about Joey Votto earlier tonight. (If you can’t watch the video through Twitter, this link should work.)

In the two minute-long video, Votto talks about how many Reds fans have the wrong idea about him. He attributes this to his workmanlike demeanor and to a “skewed perspective” from writers, which has caused Reds fans to view him as aloof and uncaring. Votto says he wants fans to get to know him better.

Votto has also been a lightning rod in the debate between fans of newer stats and fans of older stats. Back in June, Reds broadcaster Marty Brennaman slammed Votto for not having many RBI — he had 37 at the time, on a pace for 80 over a full season. In a radio interview at the end of October, Votto dismissed the judgment directed at him based on RBI, explaining that his number one job is to get on base whether it’s with a hit or with a walk, seemingly aligning himself more with the new school way of thinking.

Love him or hate him, Votto is a very perceptive and introspective person, and we need more players like him in sports these days.

By the way, you can support Votto’s charity by visiting VottoFoundation.org, which helps those suffering from post traumatic stress disorder.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.