Twelve hours to spring training: 1976

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A fantastic road trip story from former major league journeyman pitcher John D’Acquisto. He tells of the twelve hours before reporting to spring training for the Giants in 1976. He, John Montefusco and Randy Moffitt in a Porche, racing to make it from Foster City, California to Phoenix in time to report to camp.

I picked up Moffitt at his place. Randy’s wife came out to see us off. I threw his bag in the trunk and handed him the keys for the long journey. With our history of aggressive driving, the willingness to air out these badass sports cars, and hell, just the general testosterone of dudes under 25, all the wives thought we were out of our minds to drive to Arizona. Count and Ed had followed us to Moff’s house as we mapped out the race. Moff and I shared a quick laugh watching the six-foot-seven Halicki trying to pack himself into Count’s Porsche.

“How’s that big son of a bitch gonna get himself in,” Moff laughed, scratching his head as he opened the driver’s side door to my car.

Along the way there is fast driving. There is silliness. There is also a pretty deep contemplation of how quickly youth is lost and how uncertain even the most seemingly cocksure young jocks can be.

Great story.

(link via BTF)

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.