Abundance of “old school” types in Phillies organization intrigued pitching coach Bob McClure

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At the end of September, the Phillies said goodbye to longtime pitching coach Rich Dubee. Dubee had been with the club for nine seasons. In November, the Phillies announced they had hired Bob McClure to be their new pitching coach. McClure had previously coached for the Rockies, Royals, and Red Sox.

Also during the off-season, the Phillies hired an analytics “extern”, who eventually became a full-time employee — the organization’s first foray into analytics. The Phillies have been the laughingstock of the league, not just for their hesitance to embrace 21st-century ideas, but for their outright dismissal of them. In January last year, in defense of his signing of Delmon Young, GM Ruben Amaro famously said that he isn’t concerned with a player’s [lack of] walks, and that he cares about his overall production.

McClure said recently, “There’s a lot of good old-school baseball people here and that intrigued me.” McClure added that he thinks the use of baseball data can be “overdone”. Via Jim Salisbury of CSN Philly:

McClure’s keep-it-simple style won’t include bombarding his pitchers with analytical data. He believes too much of that can get in the way of executing the pitch.

“So many organizations are getting into the computer and data and number crunching,” he said. “There’s a lot of good old-school baseball people here and that intrigued me.

“I use it. I think there’s a place for old school with the new stuff and a place for new stuff with the old school. I think a mixture is good. But for me, I think it can be overdone.”

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

Video: The greatest — or worst — first pitch of all time

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The Red Sox are celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1967 “Impossible Dream” team during Wednesday night’s series finale against the Cardinals. Jordan Leandre took the mound to throw out the first pitch. With past players lined up behind him, Leandre wound up and fired to home… juuuuust a bit outside. The ball hit photographer Tony Capobianco right in the family jewels.

Video from Bleacher Report’s Steve Perrault:

To his credit, Capobianco had a sense of humor about it:

Wil Myers stole second, third, and home in the same inning

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Padres first baseman Wil Myers hit an RBI single off of Nick Pivetta in the bottom of the fourth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game, giving his team a 1-0 lead. He then proceeded to steal second base, then third base, and finally home on a double-steal, scoring the Padres’ second run.

Per CSN Philly’s Marshall Harris, it’s the first time a player has stolen all three bases in the same inning since Marlins second baseman Dee Gordon in 2011. Indeed, on July 1 that year, Gordon stole all three bases against Angels pitcher Bobby Cassevah.

Myers is currently batting .238/.322/.459 with 24 home runs, 59 RBI, 61 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases in 491 plate appearances this season.