Pete Rose continues to be full of it

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Pete Rose periodically gives interviews in which he says that gambling may be bad, but it’s nowhere near as bad as PEDs are. He has a little rehearsed spiel too, in which he says “ask Babe Ruth, ask Roger Maris, ask Hank Aaron” etc., about how they feel that their records were broken by PED users. He said this almost word-for-word in 2010 and said it again to Michael Kay yesterday:

“They’re both bad. I think in my case, I know I didn’t do anything to alter the statistics of baseball,” Rose said . . . I had nothing to do with altering statistics of baseball, and these guys, that take PEDs—wouldn’t it be nice if you could ask Babe Ruth the same question, or Roger Maris the same question or Hank Aaron, who won’t talk about it. I’d like to hear what their response will be because those are the guys who lost their records because of supposedly steroids.”

At times like this I think it’s worth reminding people that (a) Rose took amphetamines as a player, and they are clearly performance-enhancing (b) Paul Janzen, the man who, according to the Dowd Report, was Rose’s primary bet-placer was also a steroids dealer; (c) one of Rose’s best friends during his gambling days was a minor leaguer, Tommy Gioiosa, who was a heavy steroids user who shot up in front of Pete and to whom Pete constantly asked questions about steroids and PEDs, contemplating using them to extend his already lengthy career. A lengthy career that had him eke just past Ty Cobb for the hit record.

Wouldn’t it be nice, Pete, if you could ask Ty Cobb about that?

Dustin Fowler is suing the White Sox over an outfield collision

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Tom Schuba of the Chicago Sun-Times reports that Athletics outfielder Dustin Fowler has filed suit against the White Sox for negligence. Fowler sustained a season-ending injury during a collision at Guaranteed Rate Field last June and is also bringing the lawsuit against the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority agency, as neither party took measures to secure the ballpark’s unpadded electrical box that exacerbated his injuries.

The 22-year-old outfielder was just two outs into his major league debut with the Yankees when the incident occurred. Fowler tracked a Jose Abreu foul ball down the first base line and flipped over the short railing. He was noticeably limping after colliding with a knee-high electrical box at the wall and collapsed to the ground within seconds before being carted off the field.

The official diagnosis: a ruptured patellar tendon and season-ending surgery on his right knee. Per Schuba’s report, which can be read here in full, Fowler has claimed “‘severe and permanent’ external and internal injuries, as well as mental pain and anguish” following the collision.

No specific demands have been publicized yet. Fowler is said to be seeking money from both the White Sox and the Sports Facilities Authority, likely enough to cover the “large sums” he spent on medical care for the surgery and related treatments.