Grady Sizemore: “I’m healthy, I’m good to go”

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Grady Sizemore, who turned down a deal with the Reds to sign a $750,000 contract with the Red Sox, arrived at spring training yesterday and sounded pretty optimistic about his health status after sitting out all of 2012 and 2013.

Sizemore hasn’t been healthy and effective since way back in 2009, but he’s still just 31 years old and can earn up to $6 million from Boston via incentives.

Here’s what he told Rob Bradford of WEEI.com:

I’m healthy. I’m good to go. There will still be some things that I’m working on this spring, just trying to get back to 100 percent. I’m not necessarily in baseball shape but I’m in good physical shape, moving around good. I’m just looking forward to playing baseball.

It’s all going to be bad early. Not bad, but it’s going to be rusty. Any offseason you come in you feel rusty, but when you haven’t played in two years and the better part of four years you’ve been injured. Timing is going to be off. It’s going to be tough. Obviously it’s going to be a big adjustment early. Just not going getting too frustrated, knowing you’re going to go through some bumps early on and that’s expected.

Sizemore is basically a $750,000 lottery ticket for the Red Sox, which is a drop in the MLB payroll bucket. Last time he played a full, healthy season he finished 10th in the MVP voting, won a Gold Glove and a Silver Slugger, and made the All-Star team. But for a sense of how long ago that was: Evan Longoria was the AL Rookie of the Year.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: