todd helton getty

Rockies will retire Todd Helton’s number 17

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For the first time since 1997, the Rockies will have a full-time first baseman not named Todd Helton. Helton announced his retirement in September, ending a 17-year Major League career. His Hall of Fame case will be debated in earnest the closer we get to 2018. For now, as Troy Renck of the Denver Post reports, the Rockies will honor Helton by retiring his number 17 on August 17.

[Helton] will become the first Rockie to receive the honor for his playing career in a pregame ceremony at Coors Field on Aug. 17, fitting for No. 17.

It will conclude “Retire 17” weekend. The three-day event begins with a Todd Helton Farewell bobblehead on Aug. 15 for the first 15,000 fans. Saturday will feature Helton collectible jerseys, and Sunday will include the ceremony and Helton bobblehead gnomes for 15,000 fans.

Helton had a ridiculous five-season run from 2000-04 in which he posted an aggregate .349/.450/.643 line. He led the league in all three triple-slash categories in 2000 and blasted 49 home runs in ’01. He retires with a career .316/.414/.539 line, one of just 17 players since 1901 (min. 7,500 career plate appearances) in the .300/.400/.500 club:

Player Year BA OBP SLG PA From To
Todd Helton 2013 .316 .414 .539 9453 1997 2013
Albert Pujols 2013 .321 .410 .599 8546 2001 2013
Chipper Jones 2012 .303 .401 .529 10614 1993 2012
Manny Ramirez 2011 .312 .411 .585 9774 1993 2011
Frank Thomas 2008 .301 .419 .555 10075 1990 2008
Larry Walker 2005 .313 .400 .565 8030 1989 2005
Edgar Martinez 2004 .312 .418 .515 8674 1987 2004
Stan Musial 1963 .331 .417 .559 12717 1941 1963
Ted Williams 1960 .344 .482 .634 9788 1939 1960
Mel Ott 1947 .304 .414 .533 11348 1926 1947
Jimmie Foxx 1945 .325 .428 .609 9676 1925 1945
Lou Gehrig 1939 .340 .447 .632 9663 1923 1939
Rogers Hornsby 1937 .358 .434 .577 9480 1915 1937
Babe Ruth 1935 .342 .474 .690 10622 1914 1935
Harry Heilmann 1932 .342 .410 .520 8966 1914 1932
Ty Cobb 1928 .366 .433 .512 13082 1905 1928
Tris Speaker 1928 .345 .428 .500 11992 1907 1928
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 2/9/2014.

Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
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The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.