Selig: Washington is a “prime candidate” to host the 2017 All-Star Game

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Commissioner Bud Selig says that Washington, D.C. is a “prime candidate” to host the 2017 All-Star Game, reports James Wagner of the Washington Post. The Lerner family, which owns the Nationals, has been making a concerted effort to bring the midsummer classic to the nation’s capital. Selig was light on specifics, but made a point to say that the Nationals were at or near the top of the list.

This year’s All-Star Game will pop up at Target Field in Minnesota. Cincinnati plays host at Great American Ball Park next year. 2016’s host has yet to be announced but it will very likely go to an American League team, as hosts have tended to alternate leagues in the past. That means 2017 is likely the earliest the Nationals could play host.

Wagner mentions that teams with newer stadiums are also given priority, which means that San Diego (Petco Park), Miami (Marlins Park), and Philadelphia (Citizens Bank Park) could also make an effort for the 2017 All-Star Game.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.