Red Sox showing interest in bringing back Joel Hanrahan

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Despite posting a 9.82 ERA in 7 1/3 innings and having to undergo surgery on his right elbow last season, the Red Sox are considering bringing reliever Joel Hanrahan back, according to WEEI’s Rob Bradford. The Sox traded for Hanrahan and Brock Holt in December 2012, sending Ivan DeJesus, Mark Melancon, Stolmy Pimentel, and Jerry Sands to the Pirates in return.

Hanrahan, 32, went on the disabled list after an appearance on May 6 against the Twins. He allowed one run in two-thirds of an inning. On May 16th, Hanrahan underwent Tommy John surgery, had his flexor tendon repaired, and had bone chips removed.

Hanrahan earned $7.04 million last season, but may have to settle for a minor league deal going into 2014.

The Red Sox were also one of the teams watching Ryan Madson audition, according to the Boston Globe’s Nick Cafardo.

Report: Pete Mackanin fined Odubel Herrera for attempting to steal despite red light

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CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury reports that Phillies outfielder Odubel Herrera was fined an undisclosed amount by manager Pete Mackanin for attempting to steal a base on Saturday against the Diamondbacks despite being given a red light. Herrera, arguably the Phillies’ best base runner, usually has a green light, but Mackanin felt that Herrera stealing and opening up first base would have prompted the D-Backs to intentionally walk Cameron Rupp to get to the pitcher’s spot in the lineup.

The incident occurred in the top of the sixth inning with the Phillies trailing 3-2. Starter Robbie Ray got the first two Phillies out, but Herrera kept the inning alive with a line drive single to right field. Before the second pitch to Rupp, Ray picked off Herrera in a play that was scored 1-3-4.

According to Salisbury, although Mackanin wouldn’t confirm or deny that he fined Herrera, he did say, “Base running matters.”

This is not the first base running blunder Herrera has had this season. Last week, Herrera ran through third base coach Juan Samuel’s stop sign in an attempt to score the game-winning run. And it’s also not the first bit of contention between Mackanin and his players. There was apparently some miscommunication between him and reliever Pat Neshek last week as well.

The Phillies enter play Tuesday night with baseball’s worst record at 24-51. That puts them on pace for a 52-110 season.

Former Mets pitcher Anthony Young dies at 51

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Former Mets pitcher Anthony Young died on Tuesday at the age of 51, the team said. Young was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor in February.

Young, 51, pitched parts of six seasons in the majors from 1991-96. He began his big league career with the Mets in 1991 and stayed with the team through ’93. He famously failed to win a game between April 24, 1992 and July 24, 1993. During that span of time, he went 0-27. It was a great example, even back then, of the uselessness of won-lost records. Young posted a respectable 4.17 ERA in ’92 and 3.77 in ’93.

Former pitcher Turk Wendell, who was Young’s teammate with the Cubs in 1994-95, called Young “a true gentleman.”