A Cubs spokesman bluffs about the team possibly leaving Wrigley Field

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As far as bluffs go, this one would have seemed laughable not too long ago, but then the Braves just up and decided to leave their relatively new ballpark for the suburbs so I suppose anything can happen. But still, this seems like a pretty weak bluff.  Via the Chicago Tribune’s story about the inpasse the Cubs and the rooftop owners have reached regarding view-blocking signage and scoreboards:

In a separate interview on WSCR-AM,  Cubs spokesman Julian Green said the possibility of leaving Wrigley Field remains, though the Ricketts family wants to win a World Series at Wrigley Field.

“How far do you go before you say ‘You know what? We tried and we tried to make the good effort, but it didn’t work out?’” Green said. “I won’t speak on behalf of the family, but I’m sure this is weighing heavily on them because they want to move forward on this.”

A lot farther than this, that’s how far you go. According to the article the Cubs get $3-4 million a year in revenue from the rooftop owners and are looking to get $15-20 million a year from ads on billboards and scoreboards that would block their view. So I guess you see how much money they have to play with to buy out their increasingly estranged business partners across the street.

Or I guess they can see if there are suckers in Schaumburg like the ones the Braves found in Cobb County.

Scooter Gennett wins arbitration case against Reds

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The Reds lost their first arbitration case of the offseason, per a report from Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports. Second baseman Scooter Gennett was awarded the $5.7 million salary figure he was seeking from the team, a $600,000 bump over the $5.1 million they countered with last month.

Gennett, 27, is coming off of a career-best performance in 2017. After getting claimed off of waivers by the Reds last March, he broke out with an impressive .295/.342/.531 batting line, 27 home runs and 2.4 fWAR in 497 plate appearances. By season’s end, he ranked among the top five most productive second basemen in the National League (and 12th overall). He’s currently set to remain under team control through 2019.

Gennett was only the second Reds player to go to an arbitration hearing this winter. Fellow infielder Eugenio Suarez was defeated in arbitration last week and stands to make just $3.75 million compared to the $4.2 million he filed for in January. All 22 arbitration cases have now been resolved. Twelve were decided in favor of the players.