Deep thought: Could replay delays lead to faster games?

21 Comments

I know that sounds counterintuitive — and it may be dumb wishful thinking — but I just read a Matt Williams quote about replay that makes me wonder if some delays-in-play brought on by replay may, in the long term, lead to faster game play.  Here’s what Williams said:

Williams said another issue would be if managers tried to stall while other team officials monitored the play to determine whether the play was worthy of instant replay. The rules say a manager must react in a timely manner, meaning before the pitcher and catcher are set to face the next batter, if he wants to officially review a call.

“There’s some cagey managers in this game,” Williams said with a sheepish grin.

I doubt managers will obviously stall. That’s because there are so many existing, accepted ways for players to stall. The pitcher and catcher will know when there was a controversial play on defense. They can fart around, visit and do all sorts of things like they already do to stall a bit. If it’s a play the offense may want reviewed the batter has a whole host of fidgets and glove-adjustments and oh, I need a new bat things to buy time.

They do this all the time now and it’s what has led to such long games these days. And we let them do it because, however annoying, it’s not truly affecting the game. But when they do it to mess with a replay review, people will probably take notice. And the only way to crack down on that is to crack down on the behavior itself — the fidgeting and farting around — and how do you craft new rules or make a point of stricter enforcement regarding such things in the replay context without regulating the behavior overall?

Maybe someone stepping out of the box too much or pitchers pacing behind the mound and wiping their brow too often will mess with replay enough to where baseball actually cracks down on it. And maybe the behavior is reduced overall as a result.

Or, like I said, maybe I’m just engaging in wishful thinking here.

Mike Moustakas sets Royals single-season record with 37th home run

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas belted his 37th home run on Wednesday evening, setting a new club record for homers in a single season. Moustakas had been tied with Steve Balboni, who hit 36 home runs in 1985.

The home run came on a 2-0, 82 MPH slider from Blue Jays reliever Carlos Ramirez, boosting the Royals’ lead to 13-0 in the top of the sixth inning.

Moustakas, 29, entered the night batting .271/.313/.523 with 82 RBI and 71 runs scored in 560 plate appearances.

Chris Sale records his 300th strikeout this season

Adam Glanzman/Getty Images
3 Comments

Red Sox starter Chris Sale recorded his 300th strikeout of the 2017 season on Wednesday night against the Orioles. The momentous occasion occurred with two outs in the eighth inning. Facing Ryan Flaherty, Sale threw a slider that caught the strike zone low and inside for called strike three.

Sale and Clayton Kershaw (2015) are the only pitchers to strikeout 300-plus batters in a season in the last 15 years. Curt Schilling and Randy Johnson accomplished the feat in 2002, and Johnson also did it in 2001 and 2000. Pedro Martinez had been the only other Red Sox pitcher to have a 300-strikeout season.

Through eight scoreless innings, Sale limited the Orioles to four hits with no walks and 13 strikeouts. The Red Sox offense gave him plenty of run support. Mookie Betts and Devin Marrero each hit two-run home runs in the fourth. Hanley Ramirez added a two-run double in the sixth and Dustin Pedroia hit a two-run double of his own in the eighth to make it 8-0.