Buster Posey staying mum on rule changes for collisions

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Whether he likes it or not, Giants catcher Buster Posey has become the poster child for the home plate collision controversy. In 2011, Posey was bowled over at home plate by Marlins outfielder Scott Cousins, suffering a myriad of season-ending injuries: a fractured leg and three torn ankle ligaments. Since then, other catchers have suffered — unnecessarily, some would argue — concussions and other, less severe injuries. Rule changes have been proposed, but if you’re looking for Posey’s opinion, you won’t be hearing it.

Via Andrew Baggarly of CSN Bay Area:

“I try to keep myself out of the conversation as much as I can, because I know people will connect me to it regardless,” said Posey […]

“I’m kind of sitting back and letting the higher powers figure it out. I have my thoughts, but I’ll keep them to myself.”

Posey added that he doesn’t want it to be about him, which is respectable and admirable.

As Baggarly explains, the proposed rule changes would make hits like the one that ended Posey’s 2011 season illegal. However, any official rule changes are unlikely to be adopted in time for the beginning of the season.

Mets sign Matt Purke to minors deal

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The Mets signed left-hander Matt Purke to a minor league deal, the team announced Friday. Purke will also receive an invitation to spring training, where he could presumably beef up the club’s left-handed relief options alongside Jerry Blevins and Josh Smoker.

Purke has not appeared in the majors since 2016, when he was used in a dozen relief appearances by the White Sox. The 27-year-old racked up a 5.50 ERA, 6.0 BB/9 and 7.5 SO/9 in his first 18 innings with the team, and was demoted to Triple-A Charlotte in June to finish out the season. He spent the entire 2017 season in Triple-A as well, showing more promise with a 3.84 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 11.0 SO/9 in 48 appearances.

While Purke may not amount to much more than a depth piece in New York’s ‘pen, the veteran lefty figures to be part of the Mets’ new bullpen-first strategy next year. Reports from MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo indicate that the club will be focusing on improving their relief options in order to ease the workload of their starting pitchers, and will likely add a few more arms before the offseason comes to a close.