Giants third base coach Tim Flannery raises $96,000 for Bryan Stow

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It’s been nearly three years since Bryan Stow was seriously injured in an attack outside of Dodger Stadium on Opening Day, but he remains a constant in the hearts and minds of the Giants organization.

According to the Associated Press, Giants third base coach Tim Flannery presented the Stow family with $96,000 over the weekend to help with his medical costs. Stow suffered traumatic injuries and brain damage as a result of the attack and is now being cared for by his parents.

Flannery and his band, the Lunatic Fringe, raised the money during four nights of sold-out concerts in Northern California. Giants reliever Jeremy Affeldt donated $25,000 to match Flannery’s initial total while former Giants great Will Clark donated $10,000. All proceeds from Flannery’s latest album will also go to the Stow family.

“I don’t think we could even begin to explain how much the efforts of all the people involved mean to us,” Stow’s sister, Bonnie Stow, wrote in an email Monday. “They’re all busy people, with their own lives going on, yet they take the time to put on these shows to help Bryan. It’s like `thank you’ just isn’t enough. Even when he’s not playing these shows, Tim stays in touch with our family and sends his love to Bryan continuously. He’s amazing.”

Flannery, who has since received a thank you voicemail from Bryan, said he viewed this as “a great opportunity to let the family know that people still are thinking about them.”

Well done to all involved.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.