Mariners content to add complementary players going into spring training

27 Comments

The Mariners made the biggest news of the off-season, signing second baseman Robinson Cano to a ten-year, $240 million contract. As beneficial as the signing portends to be, at least in the early going, the consensus was that the Mariners needed to a lot more to improve on last year’s 71-91 record. They were rumored to have interest in trading for Rays starter David Price, signing Japanese starter Masahiro Tanaka, or grabbing slugger Nelson Cruz.

Since the Cano signing, the Mariners have been quiet, bringing aboard Corey Hart and John Buck since then, hardly the type of signings that might help transform them into an AL West contender. Despite the lack of action, and despite the remaining big names still on the free agent board, GM Jack Zduriencik is content to avoid the big deal. Per MLB.com’s Greg Johns:

“We’re reaching out and are going to bring some players to Spring Training that aren’t big investments, but are veteran players that might have a chance to fill a role and take some pressure off these younger kids,” Zduriencik said. “I don’t think we’re going to jump in and invest where some of these dollars are going. It just doesn’t make sense when you take a 30-, 31-, 32-year old pitcher that wants five or six years and there is some history there of injury or inconsistencies. That’s a pretty big risk, and I think we have to look at this in the big picture.”

Johns mentions that, with Ervin Santana and Ubaldo Jimenez waiting to be signed, the Mariners have instead shown interest in Scott Baker. Baker missed all of 2012 and tossed just 15 innings last season after recovering from Tommy John surgery. The 32-year-old right-hander is trying to work his way back into a regular job, likely having to settle for a minor league deal.

2017 Preview: The American League Central

Getty Images
1 Comment

For the past few weeks we’ve been previewing the 2017 season. Here, in handy one-stop-shopping form, is our package of previews from the American League Central

Do the Indians have a weakness? Do the Tigers and Royals have one more playoff push in them or do they have to start contemplating rebuilds? The White Sox and Twins are rebuilding, but do either of them have a chance to be remotely competitive?

As we sit here in March, the answers are “not really,” “possibly,” and “not a chance.” There are no games that count this March, however, so they’re just guesses. But educated ones! Here are the links to our guesses and our education for all of the clubs of the AL Central:

Cleveland Indians
Detroit Tigers
Kansas City Royals
Chicago White Sox
Minnesota Twins

2017 Preview: The National League East

Getty Images
2 Comments

For the past few weeks we’ve been previewing the 2017 season. Here, in handy one-stop-shopping form, is our package of previews from the National League East

The Washington Nationals crave a playoff run that doesn’t end at the division series. The Mets crave a season in which they don’t have a press conference about an injured pitcher. The Marlins are trying to put the nightmare of the end of the 2016 behind them. The Phillies and Braves are hoping to move on from the “lose tons of games” phase of their rebuilds and move on to the “hey, these kids can play!” phase.

There is a ton of star power in the NL East — Harper, Scherzer, Cespedes, Syndergaard, Stanton, Freeman — some great young talent on ever roster and, in Ichiro and Bartolo, the two oldest players in the game. Maybe the division can’t lay claim to the best team in baseball, but there will certainly be some interesting baseball in the division.

Here’s how each team breaks down:

Washington Nationals
New York Mets
Miami Marlins
Philadelphia Phillies
Atlanta Braves