Matt Harvey is feeling great, pushing his rehab schedule as hard as he can

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Daniel Barbarisi of the Wall Street Journal caught up with Matt Harvey and updates us on his rehab. Short version: everything is feeling great. Almost too great:

Harvey says he has progressed from rehabbing his arm to regular upper-body workouts, and he hopes to begin playing catch by the end of February. He believes he is going as fast, and doing as well, as the rehab schedule allows. He says he has felt no pain, that there have been no setbacks, and that his rehab coordinator at the Hospital for Special Surgery has had to slow the recovery timetable for its own sake.

Harvey wants to begin throwing in February and, if he had his way, would pitch in 2014. He knows he doesn’t have his way, however, and that the Mets are not going to risk several years of their future with Harvey at the top of their rotation in the interests of having him pitch some, in all likelihood, meaningless games this September.

Also worth nothing that in recent years a lot of pitchers, especially younger ones, have been quoted as feeling fantastic in the months after their Tommy John surgery, and are almost surprised that they don’t have pain and all of that. But what most of them learn is that pain is not the issue at all. It’s all about touch and feel over pitches. That’s the reason the timetable for Tommy John is what it is, not just the actual physical recovery.

The Tigers are trying to convert Anthony Gose into a pitcher

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Tigers’ center fielder Anthony Gose wants to try his hand at pitching, according to comments made by manager Brad Ausmus on Sunday. Gose is poised to start the year in Triple-A Toledo after receiving a midseason demotion to Double-A last summer following an altercation with Triple-A manager Lloyd McClendon.

While the experiment won’t detract from Gose’s outfield work in Triple-A, the 26-year-old is expected to take on additional bullpen sessions throughout the year. According to MLB.com’s Jason Beck, the left-handed hitter last took the mound in high school, where his fastball was clocked as fast as 97 m.p.h. Gose ultimately rejected the idea of starting his professional career as a pitcher, despite receiving favorable assessments from scouts.

Ausmus said the idea first surfaced at the end of the 2016 season. It appears to be a fallback option for the outfielder, who has struggled at the plate over his five-year career in the majors. Via Chris McCosky of the Detroit News:

Doolittle in Oakland did it and he was in the big leagues a couple of years later,” Ausmus said. “It’s going to take some time. He’s going to have to be a sponge and catch up on experience fast. But we feel it’s worth investigating.

Stephen Strasburg is the Nationals’ Opening Day starter

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Nationals’ right-hander Stephen Strasburg will take the mound for the club on Opening Day, manager Dusty Baker said on Sunday. The news is hardly surprising given Max Scherzer’s questionable status this spring, though it had yet to be confirmed by the club.

Strasburg is approaching his eighth run with the club in 2017. He went 15-4 in 2016, finishing the year with a 3.60 ERA, 2.7 BB/9 and 11.2 SO/9 in 147 2/3 innings. This will mark his fourth Opening Day assignment with the Nationals.

Scherzer, the Nationals’ Opening Day starter in both 2015 and 2016, is scheduled to make his season debut sometime during the first week of the season. The right-hander is expected to take things more slowly this spring as he finishes rehabbing a stress fracture in his finger.

The Nationals will open their season against the Marlins on April 3.