Jonny Gomes scores

Jonny Gomes speaks out against A-Rod


Jonny Gomes met the media before last night’s Boston Baseball Writer’s dinner and he had some choice words for Alex Rodriguez, reports the Boston Herald:

“He does steroids or whatever, it sucks. He does this or that, it sucks. He’s always in the news, it sucks,” the Red Sox left fielder told the Herald yesterday before the 75th annual Boston Baseball Writers’ dinner. “But this is the players’ union he’s going against. It’s all of us. Not a real good idea . . . I don’t think it’s really a good idea to go after our union. Down to my (expletive) kids, down to the benefits we have, down to our retirement fund, the union makes our lives better. We pay dues to the union for our rights.”

This is not the first time Gomes has voiced his opinion on A-Rod. Back in August when Rodriguez returned from the disabled list and played while appealing his then-211-game suspension, Gomes spoke out against PED users in general and, with specific reference to Rodriguez, said “I hope our dues aren’t being used for his lawyers’ fees.”

Gomes is certainly entitled to his opinion and his opinion on Rodriguez is in the clear majority based on everything we’ve heard about player sentiments on the matter. At the same time, when union members, like Gomes, are on record saying that he’d prefer that the union not defend A-Rod, and when his opinions on A-Rod are later shown to be quite in step with other members and union leadership — really, what Gomes is saying here echoes exactly what union leadership told the players just the other day — it’s not hard to understand how someone like A-Rod can come away believing that maybe, just maybe, the union didn’t have his back. Which is the central claim in the portion of the lawsuit which relates to the MLBPA.

The World Series broadcast schedule is announced

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Major League Baseball just announced the broadcast schedule for both Games 6 and 7 (if necessary) of the NLCS and the entire World Series.

There are no surprises here. The World Series games are all on Fox. The pregame show starts at 7:30 and the games themselves start just after 8pm Eastern Daylight Time, regardless of whether it’s Chicago or Los Angeles representing the National League. For some reason Game five of the World Series, scheduled a week from Sunday if it comes to pass, starts seven minutes later than all of the other games. Maybe something super exciting will happen then.


Red Sox sports medicine director says David Ortiz “was essentially playing on stumps”

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 1: David Ortiz #34 of the Boston Red Sox tips his helmet to the crowd as he exits the game after he singled during the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays at Fenway Park on October 1, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)
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David Ortiz had a whale of a final season with the Red Sox. It was so good that he was asked, many, many times, if he was thinking of reversing his retirement decision and coming back for 2017. Ortiz always said no, he was still retiring, occasionally making mention of his aching feet and the physical grind his 40-year-old body was undergoing.

We now know just how much of a grind it was. Indeed, it was extreme. We know this because Dan Dyrek, the Red Sox’ coordinator of sports medicine services, tells it to Rob Bradford of WEEI. Dyrek says that the injuries to Ortiz’s feet, which were often referred to as achilles tendon problems, were way, way more complicated than that, affecting every muscle, bone and tendon in his feet in chain reaction fashion. Dyrek:

“He was essentially playing on stumps. Instead of having this nice, flexible, foot, ankle, calf mechanism to act as a shock absorber, he was playing on stumps. And you can do that for only so long. He was in warrior mode trying to play through this. Once we diagnosed him and saw what was going on and started explaining things to him, there was actually a sense of relief because now he had an explanation of what he was in such excruciating pain.”

That Ortiz was able to even walk through what Dyrek describes is pretty amazing. That he was able to put up a near-MVP season with all of that pain is incredible.