Report: The Yankees are now considering going after Stephen Drew

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With questions all over their infield, many have speculated that free agent Stephen Drew could be a good fit for the Yankees. Now that the Yankees have blown past the $189 million threshold with the Masahiro Tanaka signing, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman hears that they are considering the possibility:

There has been a thought the Yankees might be willing to keep spending after landing star Japanese free agent pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. But while there doesn’t seem to be a push for another top starter or reliever, Drew is one free agent the Yankees are at least weighing, according to people familiar with their thinking.

The Yankees have spent $470 million already this winter, but there doesn’t appear to be a precise limit now that the luxury tax threshhold has already been surpassed — and that’s very likely especially true when it comes to Red Sox players. Although the Yankees apparently aren’t quite a bottomless pit of cash, a possible run at Drew “depends on the price” according to a person familiar with their thinking.

Drew has exclusively played shortstop in the majors, but he would likely play second base if Derek Jeter is healthy. That’s far from a guarantee, so he wouldn’t be bad insurance to have around. The Yankees brought back Brendan Ryan this offseason, but he obviously provides very little with the bat. As of now, the Yankees are counting on Brian Roberts to play second base and Kelly Johnson to play third base.

The market for Drew has been rather quiet this winter, partially because he’s attached to draft pick compensation, but also because there aren’t many teams in the market for shortstops. The door isn’t closed for a return to the Red Sox and the Mets are still lurking in the background, but Heyman speculates that Drew could be a fit with teams like the Blue Jays and A’s if he’s willing to play second base.

Robinson Cano hit his 300th home run last night

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Last night Robinson Cano hit a solo homer in the ninth inning of the Mariners’ loss to the Texas Rangers. It was his 22nd on the season. Though it was insignificant to the outcome of that game, it was significant to Cano: it was his 300th career homer.

While we’ve become accustomed to not caring much about home run milestones south of, say, 500, 300 homers for Cano is a big deal, as he’s only the third second baseman to cross that threshold in baseball history. The other two: Jeff Kent, at 377, and Rogers Hornsby at 301.

Cano, who turns 35 next month, has a career line of .305/.354/.495 and 1,179 RBI, 512 doubles and 33 triples to go with those bombs. He’s in his 13th big league season and still has six more years left on his deal with the Mariners. He’s averaged 24 homers a year since coming to the Mariners. While he’ll obviously trail off at some point — and while great second baseman’s have this weird habit of just suddenly falling off a cliff — it’s highly likely that he’ll finish his career as the all-time home run leader among second baseman. If he remains healthy he should also get over 3,000 hits in his career.

Cooperstown, here he comes.

Reds sign catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year deal

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Mark Sheldon of MLB.com reports that the Reds have signed catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year contract extension. The terms: $16 million total, with a $7.5 million club option for the 2022 season that has a $500,000 buyout. He also received a $1.75 million signing bonus.

The deal buys out all three of his arbitration years — he was going to be eligible for the first time this offseason — and the first year of his potential free agency. The club option buys a second. Barnhart made $575,000 this season.

Barnhart, 26, is finishing his second season as the Reds primary catcher. This year he’s hitting .272/.349/.399 with six homers and 42 RBI in 113 games. For his career he has a line of .257/.328/.366 in 330 major league games. His real value is defensive, however. He leads the National League in caught stealing percentage and number of base stealers caught (31-for-70, 44%) and leads all players at any position in the league in defensive WAR according to Baseball-Reference.com.