Report: The Yankees are now considering going after Stephen Drew

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With questions all over their infield, many have speculated that free agent Stephen Drew could be a good fit for the Yankees. Now that the Yankees have blown past the $189 million threshold with the Masahiro Tanaka signing, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman hears that they are considering the possibility:

There has been a thought the Yankees might be willing to keep spending after landing star Japanese free agent pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. But while there doesn’t seem to be a push for another top starter or reliever, Drew is one free agent the Yankees are at least weighing, according to people familiar with their thinking.

The Yankees have spent $470 million already this winter, but there doesn’t appear to be a precise limit now that the luxury tax threshhold has already been surpassed — and that’s very likely especially true when it comes to Red Sox players. Although the Yankees apparently aren’t quite a bottomless pit of cash, a possible run at Drew “depends on the price” according to a person familiar with their thinking.

Drew has exclusively played shortstop in the majors, but he would likely play second base if Derek Jeter is healthy. That’s far from a guarantee, so he wouldn’t be bad insurance to have around. The Yankees brought back Brendan Ryan this offseason, but he obviously provides very little with the bat. As of now, the Yankees are counting on Brian Roberts to play second base and Kelly Johnson to play third base.

The market for Drew has been rather quiet this winter, partially because he’s attached to draft pick compensation, but also because there aren’t many teams in the market for shortstops. The door isn’t closed for a return to the Red Sox and the Mets are still lurking in the background, but Heyman speculates that Drew could be a fit with teams like the Blue Jays and A’s if he’s willing to play second base.

Why Ryan Zimmerman skipped spring training

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All spring training there was at least some mild confusion about Nationals first baseman Ryan Zimmerman. He played in almost no regular big league spring training games, instead, staying on the back fields, playing in simulated and minor league contests. When that usually happens, it’s because a player is rehabbing or even hiding an injury, but the Nats insisted that was not the case with Zimmerman. Not everyone believed it. I, for one, was skeptical.

The skepticism was unwarranted, as Zimmerman answered the bell for Opening Day and has played all season. As Jared Diamond of the Wall Street Journal writes today, it was all by design. He skipped spring training because he doesn’t like it and because he thinks it’ll help him avoid late-season injuries and slowdowns, the likes of which he has suffered over the years.

It’s hard to really judge this now, of course. On the one hand Zimmerman has started really slow this season. What’s more, he has started to show signs of warming up only in the past week, after getting almost as many big league, full-speed plate appearances under his belt as a normal spring training would’ve given him. On the other hand, April is his worst month across his entire 14-year career, so one slow April doesn’t really prove anything and, again, Zimmerman and the Nats will consider this a success if he’s healthy and productive in August and September.

It is sort of a missed opportunity, though. Players hate spring training. They really do. if Zimmerman had made a big deal out of skipping it and came out raking this month, I bet a lot more teams would be amenable to letting a veteran or three take it much more easy next spring. Good ideas can be good ideas even if they don’t produce immediately obvious results, but baseball tends to encourage a copycat culture only when someone can point to a stat line or to standings as justification.

Way to ruin it for everyone, Ryan. 😉