Marlins interested in signing Giancarlo Stanton to an extension

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The Marlins and outfielder Giancarlo Stanton avoided arbitration last week by agreeing to a one-year, $6.5 million contract. The two sides haven’t discussed the possibility of a contract extension yet, but the team remains interested in getting a long-term deal done:

While that’s all well and good, it takes two to tango. And Stanton, understandably, might want another dance partner. As you’ll recall, the young slugger was quite vocal in his displeasure about the direction of the franchise last offseason, fueling speculation that he’ll leave the first chance he gets. While the Marlins have some promising young players, they haven’t given any indication that they are going to put money into the team. Of course, time could heal those old wounds, especially if the price is right, but those trade rumors will only get louder if the interest is not mutual.

Stanton, 24, was arbitration-eligible for the first time this winter. He remains under team control through 2016.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”