Angels sign Ian Stewart to a minor league deal

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Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register is reporting that the Angels have signed infielder Ian Stewart to a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training. Stewart has had a rough go of it on the field over the last few years, but found himself in hot water last June when he went on Twitter and complained about how the Cubs were using him.

Stewart posted a .464 OPS in 136 plate appearances with the Rockies in 2011. He also missed time with a wrist injury and moved back and forth between the Majors and Triple-A Colorado Springs a couple times. After the season, the Cubs signed him as a free agent, but Stewart posted a meager .627 OPS in 202 plate appearances. In June, he suffered a wrist injury and went under the knife in July, ending his season.

Last season, Stewart strained his quadriceps early in spring training and missed the start of the season with Triple-A Iowa. He posted just a .657 OPS at Triple-A with the Cubs. They released Stewart in early July after he went public with his criticism. The Dodgers picked him up, but the results weren’t any better. With Triple-A Albuquerque, Stewart posted a .638 OPS.

While Stewart has spent a majority of his career at third base, he has experience playing second base and he can play either outfield corner or first base in a pinch. On a no-risk deal, it’s difficult to see the downside for the Angels, even with Stewart’s questionable history in terms of health, production, and behavior.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.