CC Sabathia may or may not be in the Best Shape of His Life

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Crazy pic of CC Sabathia at a wedding over the weekend:

But, before you go acting all shocked, go read Ken Rosenthal’s column, in which Sabathia tells him he really hasn’t lost a ton of weight. Rather, he’s just toning up and stuff. It’s possible our reaction to this pic may be a function of seeing Sabathia in pants that fit as opposed to his physical fitness. Dude wears gigantic uniform pants.

Either way, I’ve always remained interested in Sabathia’s fitness level. Or at least the discussion about it. A lot of people remain convinced that a little extra weight on Sabathia, especially since so much of it appears to be in his legs, is actually good for his pitching because it provides a strong base and all of that. This past season he seemed to be carrying around less bulk than usual and some have attributed his lack of effectiveness in 2013 to that.

I’m not sure any strong or informed conclusions can be drawn from any of this. And even if his weight is a factor, I feel like, as is the case with every other pitcher, arm health and fatigue and all of that factor in.  Sabathia has a lot of miles on the odometer at this point. He’s not a machine.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”