Jhonny Peralta wants to prove that he can “play baseball naturally”


On August 5 last season as a member of the Tigers, shortstop Jhonny Peralta accepted a 50-game suspension for his involvement with Biogenesis. He returned for the final three games of the regular season, then joined the Tigers in the post-season against the Athletics in the ALDS and the Red Sox in the ALCS.

Peralta became a free agent after the season. His offensive output in 2011 (.824 OPS) and ’13 (.815) was rewarded with a four-year, $52 million contract with the NL champion Cardinals. GM John Mozeliak was willing to look past Peralta’s history with PED use.

As David Wilhelm of the Belleville News-Democrat reports, Peralta is motivated to prove that he can be a productive player for the Cardinals without using performance-enhancing substances.

“I’m trying to put it in the past,” Peralta said. “I’m trying to look forward and forget about it. … I know I can play baseball naturally. I have to show people that I can do it and that I can help.

“I’m going to try to do the best I can do and try to help the Cardinals go to the World Series one more time and win.”

The Cardinals badly needed an upgrade at shortstop, as they finished 2013 with the third-lowest OPS from the position in the National League at .583, ahead of only the Marlins and Mets. Pete Kozma, who got most of the playing time at shortstop for the Cardinals, posted a .548 OPS while Daniel Descalso wasn’t much better at .656.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.