40 players exchange figures with their clubs following today’s deadline

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There was a flurry of arbitration-related news today as players and teams scurried to reach agreements prior to the noon central deadline earlier. 39 players did not reach an agreement with their respective teams, and as such, they have exchanged salary figures with their clubs. Of note, Braves closer Craig Kimbrel filed for $9 million, which is a lot of money for a closer in his first year of arbitration eligibility. The Braves filed for $6.55 million while most experts projected Kimbrel to get around $7 million.

Here’s the full list of players, broken down by team:

Angels (2)

  • David Freese (3B) filed for $6M, team filed for $4.1M (source)
  • Kevin Jepsen (RP) filed for $1.625M, team filed for $1.3M (source)

Athletics (1)

  • Josh Reddick (OF) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2M (source)

Braves (3)

  • Craig Kimbrel (RP) filed for $9M, team filed for $6.55M (source)
  • Freddie Freeman (1B) filed for $5.75M, team filed for $4.5M (source)
  • Jason Heyward (RF) filed for $5.5M, team filed for $5.2M (source)

Cardinals (1)

  • Daniel Descalso (IF) filed for $1.65M, team filed for $930,000 (source)

Cubs (4)

  • Darwin Barney (2B) filed for $2.8M, team filed for $1.8M
  • Jeff Samardzija (SP) filed for $6.2M, team filed for $4.4M
  • Justin Ruggiano (CF) filed for $2.45M, team filed for $1.6M
  • Travis Wood (SP) filed for $4.25M, team filed for $3.5M (source for all four)

Diamondbacks (2)

  • Gerardo Parra (OF) filed for $5.2M, team filed for $4.3M (source)
  • Mark Trumbo (LF) filed for $5.85M, team filed for $3.4M (source)

Dodgers (2)

  • A.J. Ellis (C) filed for $4.6M, team filed for $3M (source)
  • Kenley Jansen (RP) filed for $5.05M, team filed for $3.5M (source)

Giants (2)

  • Brandon Belt (1B) filed for $3.6M, team filed for $2.05M (source)
  • Joaquin Arias (IF) filed for $1.5M, team filed for $1.1M (source)

Indians (4)

  • Josh Tomlin (SP) filed for $975,000, team filed for $800,000
  • Justin Masterson (SP) filed for $11.8M, team filed for $8.05M
  • Michael Brantley (LF) filed for $3.8M, team filed for $2.7M
  • Vinnie Pestano (RP) filed for $1.45M, team filed for $975,000 (source for all four)

Mariners (2)

  • Justin Smoak (1B) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2.025M
  • Logan Morrison (RF) filed for $2.5M, team filed for $1.1M (source for both)

Mets (2)

  • Dillon Gee (SP) filed for $4.05M, team filed for $3.2M (source)
  • Lucas Duda (1B/LF) filed for $1.9M, team filed for $1.35M (source)

Nationals (2)

  • Doug Fister (SP) filed for $8.5M, team filed for $5.75M (source)
  • Tyler Clippard (RP) filed for $6.35M, team filed for $4.45M (source)

Orioles (1)

  • Matt Wieters (C) filed for $8.75M, team filed for $6.5M (source)

Padres (1)

  • Andrew Cashner (SP) filed for $2.4M, team filed for $2.275M (source)

Phillies (2)

  • Ben Revere (CF) filed for $2.425M, team filed for $1.4M (source)
  • Antonio Bastardo (RP) filed for $2.5M, team filed for $1.675M (source)

Rangers (1)

  • Mitch Moreland (1B/DH) filed for $3.25M, team filed for $2.025M (source)

Red Sox (1)

  • Andrew Miller (RP) filed for $2.15M, team filed for $1.55M (source)

Reds (2)

  • Aroldis Chapman (RP) filed for $5.4M, team filed for $4.6M (source)
  • Homer Bailey (SP) filed for $11.6M, team filed for $8.7M (source)

Royals (3)

  • Aaron Crow (RP) filed for $1.7M, team filed for $1.28M (source)
  • Greg Holland (RP) filed for $5.2M, team filed for $4.1M (source)
  • Justin Maxwell (OF) filed for $1.7M, team filed for $1.075M (source)

Tigers (1)

  • Alex Avila (C) filed for $5.35M, team filed for $3.75M (source)

Players and teams can still reach agreements to avoid arbitration between now and when hearings start on February 1st. However, some teams simply don’t negotiate once the filing deadline passes. The Braves are one of them, as David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. GM Frank Wren said, “We have an organization philosophy of the filing date is our last date to negotiate prior to a hearing. We’re done.”

Last year, exactly zero cases went to arbitration for the first time in baseball history.

Robinson Cano hit his 300th home run last night

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Last night Robinson Cano hit a solo homer in the ninth inning of the Mariners’ loss to the Texas Rangers. It was his 22nd on the season. Though it was insignificant to the outcome of that game, it was significant to Cano: it was his 300th career homer.

While we’ve become accustomed to not caring much about home run milestones south of, say, 500, 300 homers for Cano is a big deal, as he’s only the third second baseman to cross that threshold in baseball history. The other two: Jeff Kent, at 377, and Rogers Hornsby at 301.

Cano, who turns 35 next month, has a career line of .305/.354/.495 and 1,179 RBI, 512 doubles and 33 triples to go with those bombs. He’s in his 13th big league season and still has six more years left on his deal with the Mariners. He’s averaged 24 homers a year since coming to the Mariners. While he’ll obviously trail off at some point — and while great second baseman’s have this weird habit of just suddenly falling off a cliff — it’s highly likely that he’ll finish his career as the all-time home run leader among second baseman. If he remains healthy he should also get over 3,000 hits in his career.

Cooperstown, here he comes.

Reds sign catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year deal

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Mark Sheldon of MLB.com reports that the Reds have signed catcher Tucker Barnhart to a four-year contract extension. The terms: $16 million total, with a $7.5 million club option for the 2022 season that has a $500,000 buyout. He also received a $1.75 million signing bonus.

The deal buys out all three of his arbitration years — he was going to be eligible for the first time this offseason — and the first year of his potential free agency. The club option buys a second. Barnhart made $575,000 this season.

Barnhart, 26, is finishing his second season as the Reds primary catcher. This year he’s hitting .272/.349/.399 with six homers and 42 RBI in 113 games. For his career he has a line of .257/.328/.366 in 330 major league games. His real value is defensive, however. He leads the National League in caught stealing percentage and number of base stealers caught (31-for-70, 44%) and leads all players at any position in the league in defensive WAR according to Baseball-Reference.com.