Will the MLBPA fire arbitrator Frederic Horowitz?

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The neutral third arbitrator who handles PED appeals, as well as grievances brought by players, serves at the pleasure of both Major League Baseball and the MLBPA. They can fire him for any reason. They can fire him for no reason. All that need happen is written notice from one side or the other.

We most recently saw this in 2012 when Shayam Das, the arbitrator who had been in place for 13 years, was fired by Major League Baseball. The reason? Their dissatisfaction with his ruling in the original Ryan Braun suspension and appeal, which baseball sharply criticized. Das’ firing led to the firing of Frederic Horowitz, who issued the ruling in the A-Rod case Saturday.

So: will the MLBPA fire Horowitz now? My guess is yes.

It’s not a slam dunk, of course. The MLBPA is in a slightly different position than was Major League Baseball at the time of the Das position. Yes, they opposed Horowitz’s ruling, but they also — according to the ruling itself — agreed with the manner in which Horowitz approached parts of his decision. Specifically, Horowitz claims the MLBPA agreed that his discipline should come at the Commissioner’s discretion under the “just cause” provisions of he JDA and not under the 50/100/lifetime ban provisions. And, of course, they are now being sued by Alex Rodriguez, placing them in an odd tactical position between MLB and the player.

But, the MLBPA’s concessions aside, the arbitrator did just hammer a player with more or less unprecedented discipline. For political purposes alone, one has to think that the union may want to retaliate for that and/or for MLB’s firing of Braun.

If I’m a betting man, I say that the union fires Horowitz within a week or so.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.