A-Rod sues Major League Baseball and the MLBPA in an effort to get his suspension overturned

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We knew it was coming and here it is: Alex Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players’ union Monday, seeking to overturn his 162-game suspension. The best part: as part of his suit, he had to attach the arbitrator’s decision from which he appeals. We’ll be going through it here at HBT soon and finding all the fun bits. The takeaway from arbitrator Horowitz, however?

“While this length of suspension may be unprecedented for a MLB player, so is the misconduct he committed,” Horowitz wrote in his decision Saturday.

The claims against the union revolve around A-Rod’s contention that it “completely abdicated its responsibility to Mr. Rodriguez to protect his rights” and “this inaction by MLBPA created a climate in which MLB felt free to trample” on Rodriguez’s confidentiality rights.

Read the full complaint here

As we’ve said before, the likelihood of A-Rod getting the arbitrator’s decision overturned is low. And the addition of the player’s union should be seen in the context of trying to get the arbitration to be considered a train wreck. Given how clear it was that A-Rod wanted his own legal team to take the lead, however, it’s hard now to take his claims that the union was ineffective at face value. He all but told them to get lost.

Still, fun times ahead.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.