With A-Rod ban settled, where do the Yankees go from here?

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The Yankees can finally move forward with their plans for 2014 now that Alex Rodriguez has received a 162-game ban which also includes the postseason. And they have to be pretty happy with how things have worked out.

It’s easy to see the benefits of having Rodriguez off the books for 2014, as he was due to make $25 million. Much has been made about the Yankees trying to get under the $189 million threshold, but Joel Sherman of the New York Post hears that they will still be charged $3,155,737.70 for A-Rod for luxury tax purposes for 2014 since the suspension is for 162 games and not a full year. That could cut things very close depending on what else they do this offseason.

On a related note, the Yankees are believed to be one of the front-runners for Japanese right-hander Masahiro Tanaka. The savings from A-Rod, at least for 2014, should come in handy, but Tanaka is going to be very expensive. Due to the changes associated with the posting system, it will likely require a contract north of $100 million in order to sign him. That could easily push them over the $189 million figure.

Yes, the Yankees will save money with the suspension and won’t have to deal with the daily sideshow like we saw during the second half last season, but the loss of Rodriguez adds yet another question to the team’s infield going into 2014. Derek Jeter is no sure thing after being limited to just 17 games last season and the Yankees will attempt to piece together second base following the departure of Robinson Cano. As of now, they are counting on Kelly Johnson and the injury-prone Brian Roberts to be major contributors.

There’s still a chance that the Yankees could upgrade their infield via trade, as a Brett Gardner-for-Brandon Phillips swap has been mentioned in the past, but Andrew Marchand of ESPN New York reported this morning that the Yankees were still looking at free agents Mark Reynolds and Michael Young as possible fallbacks at third base. Of course, neither are inspiring options, but there’s slim pickings out there.

Adam Eaton sustains leg injury after tripping over first base

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Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton was carried off the field after stumbling over first base on Friday night. In the ninth inning of the Nationals’ 7-5 loss to the Mets, Eaton appeared to catch his ankle on the bag as he ran out an infield single, suffering a leg injury on the fall. He was unable to put pressure on his left leg after the play and required assistance by two of the Nationals’ athletic trainers as he exited the field.

Eaton is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday, but Nationals’ manager Dusty Baker told reporters that it “doesn’t look too good.” It’s the first significant leg injury the outfielder has sustained since 2014, when he went on the 15-day disabled list with a hamstring strain. He’ll likely be replaced by Michael Taylor in center field for the next couple of games, though that could be a temporary fix as the Nationals seek a better solution during Eaton’s recovery process.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.