“The idea that Mike Piazza’s power came from nowhere is a farce”

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Some must-click linkage today from Dan Lewis over at Amazin’ Avenue. It’s about how Mike Piazza’s power clearly came late and out of a syringe.

Oh, wait. That’s not right. It’s about how that idea — which is widely parroted among Piazza’s naysayers and reported in Jeff Pearlman’s book about Rogers Clemens — is total bunk. Piazza always had power. The fact that he was, quite famously, a 62nd round draft pick instead of a big prospect is not because no one thought he had power, but because he was scouted as a right-handed first baseman who couldn’t field that position too well. As Lewis notes, however, Piazza’s power was noted by the man who scouted him and was manifest even when he was a low-level minor leaguer.

Yes, Piazza was a surprise of sorts. And it’s totally possible that, while we have no evidence of it now, it will one day be revealed that, yes, Piazza took PEDs. But the talking point that has worked strongly against his candidacy — “that guy had no power and was a low draft pick, so he must have been ‘roiding” is totally bogus.

Great job putting this together, Dan.

Note: if you like Dan’s post, you should totally sign up for his daily newsletter, called “Now I Know.” It’s not about baseball. It’s about everything. Neat and amazing fact, feats and scientific and historical events. I read it every morning and it’s almost always stuff I never, ever would have believed beforehand.

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with injury

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Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.