How many scouts actually played pro ball?


Here’s an interesting column from Conor Glassey over at Baseball Prospectus: he looks into how many baseball scouts actually played professional baseball.

I had no idea. If you had asked me before I read the story I might have said, oh, I dunno, 75%. On the basis that who is better to recognize a good pitch or a good hitting approach than someone who actually had one or was at least trained to have one. But the number is not 75% — go read the story to see the real number — and the number varies greatly depending on which organization’s scouts you look at too, which Conor breaks down.

A good takeaway comes here:

It all comes down to judging talent, regardless of your background . . . Most of the famous music executives didn’t have successful careers as musicians. That’s true for John Hammond, a talent scout with Columbia Records, who is credited with discovering and/or signing Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Billie Holliday, Leonard Cohen, and Stevie Ray Vaughan, among others. Lorne Michaels wasn’t a famous comedian, but as the creator of Saturday Night Live he has put his stamp of approval on a huge percentage of the people responsible for laughs you’ve likely enjoyed over the years.

Scouting works the same way.

I think that applies to baseball analysis and broadcasting too. Yet, for some reason, “you never played the game” is a pretty common retort from players who just got criticized and the single best predictor of who shows up as a talking head on ESPN, MLB Network, Fox and ESPN is whether or not they were a big leaguer.

Oh well.

Clayton Kershaw completes spring training with a 0.00 ERA

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Clayton Kershaw had nothing left to prove when he exited the mound during his last Cactus League start on Friday. He finished camp with a 0.00 ERA, made all the more impressive after he extended his scoreless streak to 21 1/3 innings following 6 2/3 frames of one-hit ball against the Royals.

In six spring training starts this year, the Dodgers southpaw racked up 12 hits, four walks and 23 strikeouts. His velocity appeared to fluctuate between the high-80s and low-90s from start to start, but manager Dave Roberts told reporters that he expects Kershaw to get back up to the 93 m.p.h. range next week. Kershaw is tabbed for his eighth consecutive Opening Day start on Thursday.

The 30-year-old lefty is poised to enter his 11th season with the club in 2018. He went 18-4 in 27 starts last year and turned in a 2.31 ERA, 1.5 BB/9 and 10.4 SO/9 over 175 innings. He suffered his fair share of bumps and bruises along the way, including a lower back strain that required a five-week stay on the disabled list.

The Dodgers will open their season against the Giants on Thursday, March 29 at 7:08 PM ET. Given the sudden rash of injuries that hit the Giants’ rotation earlier today, Kershaw’s Opening Day opponent has not yet been announced.