Jonathan Papelbon

Jonathan Papelbon compared the cultures of the Red Sox and Phillies

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Losing never feels good, even if you’re the most well-compensated player at your position. Following the conclusion of the 2011 season, the Phillies signed Jonathan Papelbon to the richest contract ever for a closer — a four-year, $50 million deal with a fifth-year option that can vest at an additional $13 million.

Papelbon has generally had good results, posting a 2.67 ERA in his two seasons with the Phillies, but he hasn’t been a beloved figure in Philadelphia the way he was in Boston. One reason is that Papelbon has been a rather outspoken critic of the Phillies. Last February, he said of the team’s clubhouse, “I haven’t seen any leadership.” In June, he questioned the team’s fundamentals. In July, he complained that he “definitely didn’t come [to Philadelphia] for this” after the Phillies lost their eighth game in a row.

On the air with WEEI’s Rob Bradford and guest host John McDonald on Thursday, Papelbon discussed the differences in culture between the two teams. He said:

“Look at the Red Sox last year. John [McDonald] will probably tell you the moment he walked into the Red Sox clubhouse there was an entirely different feel from when he left Philly. I’m not putting those words in John’s mouth by any means, but when you have a group of guys who go for 162 games plus spring training plus the playoffs, you have to have each other’s backs and know what he’s going to do before the next guy from you is going to do before he does it.”

Then he added:

 “Then I go to Philadelphia and it wasn’t necessarily that way, and I know that I’ve gotten a bad rap, some of the guys will say I’m not a good clubhouse guy because I’ll get upset and I’ll say something, but I’ve always said what’s on my mind. I don’t think I’ve ever shied away from my beliefs. But I think some of it reporters in Philly maybe take a little bit different because I was used to saying that, hey, this is how I feel, we’re not winning and I’m not happy.”

With the exception of Jimmy Rollins, who has drawn as much criticism in Philly as Papelbon for being willing to speak his mind, the Phillies have had a comparably quiet core of players, choosing to lead by example rather than by words. Chase Utley, Ryan Howard, Cole Hamels, and Jayson Werth have all at one point or another been seen as a source of leadership on the team over the years and they’re not the type to be expressive on the field or through the media. It just doesn’t seem like Papelbon has fit in with the Phillies or in the city of Philadelphia at large.

That being said, the bigger concern is that he lost 3 MPH on his fastball since his last season with the Red Sox, which caused his strikeout rate to drop from an elite 34 percent to a pedestrian 22 percent. The Phillies can deal with a player who likes to talk a bit too much, but they cannot justify paying $26-39 million over the next two to three years to a player whose arm is on the way out.

Brett Anderson and Mike Montgomery could share Cubs’ rotation spot in 2017

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 01:  Mike Montgomery #38 of the Chicago Cubs throws a pitch during the seventh inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game Six of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on November 1, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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Cubs’ manager Joe Maddon hasn’t selected a fifth starter for his 2017 rotation yet, but told reporters that he could envision left-handers Brett Anderson and Mike Montgomery sharing the spot throughout the year. Neither pitcher was stretched out to the full 200-inning threshold last year, Maddon added, and suggested that the two could alternate innings out of the rotation and bullpen as needed (via MLB.com’s Carrie Muskat).

Anderson, 29, was acquired by the Cubs in January on a $3.5 million deal. He’s coming off a rough 2016, during which he underwent back surgery and missed all but 11 1/3 innings of his last season with the Dodgers. His last full, healthy year in the majors yielded a 3.69 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 5.8 SO/9 over 180 1/3 innings with Los Angeles in 2015.

Montgomery, meanwhile, is vying for a rotation spot after pitching almost exclusively from the bullpen during the second half of the Cubs’ 2016 run. The 27-year-old lefty put up a 2.82 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 8.9 SO/9 over 38 1/3 innings for Chicago last year, returning in the postseason to post a 3.14 ERA during the Cubs’ championship finish.

Maddon also mentioned the possibility of throwing a sixth starter into the mix, which would help prevent his other starters from getting overworked too early in the year. Either way, Anderson and Montgomery are expected to get a lot of looks early in spring training as rotation spots are finalized in the weeks leading up to Opening Day.

Michael Bourn to miss four weeks with a broken finger

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - SEPTEMBER 6:  Michael Bourn #1 of the Baltimore Orioles looks out of the dugout as he waits to get on deck to bat during the sixth inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 6, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Orioles’ center fielder Michael Bourn is expected to be sidelined for four weeks while he rehabs a broken ring finger on his right hand, according to reports from the Baltimore Sun’s Peter Schmuck. Bourn broke the finger while playing catch with a football after a spring training workout.

The veteran outfielder re-signed with the club earlier this week on a minor league deal and was prepared to compete for a bench role this season. He’s in line to receive a $2 million salary if he makes the major league roster and can make an additional $3.5 million in incentives based on a set number of plate appearances. Now, however, his chances of cracking the roster out of spring training look considerably diminished, as his current timetable gives him an approximate return date of March 25 if all goes well.

Bourn had an impressive, if short-lived run with the Orioles following his trade to Baltimore last August, batting .283/.358/.435 with two home runs and a .793 OPS in 55 PA. While still somewhat removed from the totals that brought him an All-Star nod with the Braves in 2012, his defensive chops should give the Orioles some depth in center once he’s healthy again.